Need to Knows post-arrival at ND

We asked our incoming group of grad students what info they wanted about campus after they’ve arrived in South Bend. I’m a third year grad student, and I still had to think hard about some of these questions! We all need a bit of refresher sometimes!

What is ND Roll Call?

ND Roll Call (previously known as Web Enrollment) is a required process which informs the University that a student is attending a particular semester. It’s different than adding courses to your schedule. You will receive an email when it is necessary to complete ND Roll Call. http://registrar.nd.edu/students/ndrollcall.php

How do I get an ID Card?

To obtain your University of Notre Dame Campus ID Card you will need the following:

(1) Your valid government-issued photo ID (driver’s license, passport, or state issued ID card) and

(2) your ndID number (begins with ’90’) or netID (alpha-based prefix to your @nd.edu account).

Please bring both to the Campus Card Office located in 423 Grace Hall (Campus Map) during the hours of 8:00am – 5:00pm, Monday through Friday.

How do I register my bike?

Register your bicycle with NDSP and display the tag visibly on the bike. Registration is free and can be completed in person with your bicycle at Hammes Mowbray Hall, by flagging down an officer or at one of several registration events held throughout the year.

How do I obtain a parking pass?

Start by asking your department secretary as some departments issue parking permits under some circumstances. If needed, head over to the Parking Office located on the first floor of Hammes Mowbray Hall.  The hours are Monday through Friday, from 8:00am until 4:45pm. E-mail: parking@nd.edu Phone: (574) 631-5053

How is pay distributed?

Most students are paid on the first and fifteenth of the month. You can get the details here: http://controller.nd.edu/payroll-services/payroll-schedules/  The easiest way to receive your pay is to set it up through direct deposit. If you get direct deposit at least once a month, you can get a free account from a popular local bank called 1st source.

Where do people hang out around South Bend?

Popular places include- Chicory Cafe, The General (a coffee shop), South Bend Brew Werks, and Crooked Ewe. You often find people hanging out on the river walk located along the Saint Joseph River.

When do you register for classes and find out TA assignments?

For most grad students, registering for classes is not a competitive process. You can go on to Insidend to register for classes. In general, you will want to consult your department’s director of graduate studies (the DGS) for details on schedule formulation. The procedure for TAs is specific to the department, so contacting your DGS is a good way to get the latest updates on that as well.

How do International Students get a bank account?

This will depend largely on the particular bank. You will at least need to have a lump sum to open the account. Popular banks an international student may want to establish an account with include 1st Source, Notre Dame Federal Credit Union, and WellsFargo. 1st Source is located in the Lafortune student center on campus.

Q: Can you tell me about your campus?

Salmon Says:

According to the About section on the University of Notre Dame website: “The University of Notre Dame was founded in November 1842 by Edward F. Sorin, a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross, a French missionary order. It is located adjacent to South Bend, Indiana, the center of a metropolitan area with a population of more than 300,000. Chartered by the state of Indiana in 1844, the University was governed by the Holy Cross priests until 1967, when governance was transferred to a two-tiered, mixed board of lay and religious trustees and fellows. Notre Dame has grown from the vision of Father Sorin, who sought to establish a great Catholic university in America, and has remained faithful to both its religious and intellectual traditions. Over the years, Notre Dame has been a place where the Catholic Church could do its thinking. The first national study of Catholic elementary and secondary education was done at Notre Dame, as was the most extensive study of Catholic parish life and a landmark historical study of the Hispanic Catholic community in the United States. One of America’s leading undergraduate teaching institutions, Notre Dame also has been at the forefront in research and scholarship. The aerodynamics of glider flight, the transmission of wireless messages, and the formulae for synthetic rubber were pioneered at the University. Today researchers are achieving breakthroughs in astrophysics, radiation chemistry, environmental sciences, tropical disease transmission, peace studies, cancer, robotics, and nanoelectronics.

Notre Dame always has been heavily residential, with about four in five undergraduates living on campus. Students come to Notre Dame to learn not only how to think but also how to live, and often the experiences alumni carry from residence hall communities at Notre Dame remain vivid over a lifetime. The University always has attracted scholars who are interested in teaching and scholarship, men and women who know that a Notre Dame education is more than what is taught in classrooms and laboratories. Notre Dame has a unique spirit. It is traditional, yet open to change. It is dedicated to religious belief no less than scientific knowledge. It has always stood for values in a world of facts. It has kept faith with Father Sorin’s vision.”

For more information, feel free to explore nd.edu!

 

What’s living on campus like?

QUESTION:

What is on-campus living like for graduate students? Is it similar to undergraduate on-campus resident life?

 

SALMON SAYS:

Notre Dame has four facilities comprising two residential communities for graduate and professional students. (http://housing.nd.edu/graduate/)

While both communities strive to provide the same strong sense of connection and support experienced in our undergrad halls, and are held to the same standards of conduct, living on-campus as a post-baccalaureate student is very different than as an undergrad.  Here are some of the key differences:

  • Students live in individual apartments & townhouses, not dormitories, which allows for greater independence and autonomy.
  • Evening quiet hours are observed all year long to provide an environment conducive to scholarly success.
  • Registered guests may stay with you, with written permission of all roommates.
  • You get to park right outside your front door!

If you would like more information about living on campus, please be in touch directly with hall staff:

Nhat Nguyen, Rector, Fischer O’Hara-Grace (nnguyen3@nd.edu)
Nathan Elliot, Rector, University Village (nelliot1@nd.edu)

Is ND right for me?

SALMON SAYS:

Thank you for asking, and for your interest in graduate studies at Notre Dame.  The best advice I can give is to talk to graduate students currently studying in the program to which you are considering applying. Their experience with faculty, coursework, and navigating advanced studies within a specific departmental environment will provide you with the best insight about whether ND is the right choice for you. As to describing the Grad School culture, overall I would call it engaging. But, again, current students would be your best guide. If you want to email our Program Director, Mimi Beck, she can connect you with students in the program you are considering. She can be reached at mbeck1@nd.edu.

Q: LGBT and Non-Christian Life at ND

QUESTION:
I would like to know how life at Notre Dame is for LGBT students, allies, and Non-Christians.

SALMON SAYS:
Thank you for asking. Regarding LGBT students and allies, last year the university published, “Beloved Friends and Allies: A Pastoral Plan for the Support and Holistic Development of GLBTQ and Heterosexual Students at the University of Notre Dame” As a result of this plan, a new undergrad student organization has been formed, PrismND, and a new Assistant Director of LGBTQ initiatives named. I encourage you to be in touch with Ms. Doyle with any further specific questions you may have.

Regarding Non-Christians, approximately 29% of ND graduate students are non-Christian. And according to a recent survey of Graduate Student Life their levels of satisfaction with overall academic experience, sense of community, and quality of life do not differ significantly from that of Christian graduate students.

Things I Wish I Knew: A Letter to Incoming Students

I graduate in one week with a MA in Peace Studies from Notre Dame. The two-year program has provided amazing opportunities to grow intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually. Yet, there are things I wish I knew before coming to the program. I hope they help you in your journey as an incoming student.

  1. Your department or cohort is who you will spend the majority of your time with. The downside is that you do not have as many opportunities to get to know others in different departments. The upside is that you often become very close to those in your program. For an extrovert like me, I tried to overcome this by attending events for graduate students and meeting undergrads at football games and other campus-sponsored events. I also happened to have a few classes with undergrads and enjoyed conversation over coffee and lunch. Additionally, I contacted different professors, faculty, and administrators who I thought would be interesting to get to know and asked them out for coffee.
  2. Sometimes you will feel overwhelmed by the amount of readings, assignments, and papers you have to do. During my first semester, my professors assigned about 500-700 pages of readings each week. Remember to take a deep breath and prioritize your to-do items. Eventually you’ll develop tactics to manage your assignments.
  3. There are a lot of free events, lectures, activities, and food giveaways on campus. I discovered this fairly quickly upon arrival, but think it is important to share. Notre Dame brings in amazing speakers, ranging from Heads of State to activists. While you may be tempted to skip out on certain events because you have a lot of work, consider attending some of these each year. It is also a great way to meet other people and take a break from work.
  4. There are a lot of wonderful resources on campus-from the Rec Sports fitness facilities to the Hesburgh Library and the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC). Take advantage of the resources they offer, from kickboxing class and Kung Fu, to foreign language support.
  5. Notre Dame offers a variety of funding opportunities for research and presenting at conferences. Although MA students are not eligible for the same opportunities as Ph.D. students, I was able to secure funding to present at conferences in Italy and Spain. Consider looking at the Graduate School, Nanovic Institute, Institute for Scholarship and Liberal Studies (ISLA), and your home department.
  6. While academics are an important part of your grad school experience, don’t forget to enjoy your time on campus. Because Notre Dame’s academic programs are rigorous, it’s easy to focus all of your attention on maintaining a high GPA. While there is nothing wrong with striving for academic excellence, remember to keep things in perspective. You will develop life-long friends, be mentored by amazing faculty, and get to spend several years at one of the foremost universities in the nation. Remember to enjoy the sun after all the snow has finally fallen, meet new friends, and grow as a person.

Enjoy your time learning, growing, and experiencing all the wonderful opportunities Notre Dame offers.

Go Irish!

Tamara Shaya

Why does a university founded by a French religious order have a leprechaun as its mascot?

Notre Dame Leprechaun LogoIt didn’t always. Our sports teams have been known as the Ramblers, the Rovers, and the Irish Terriers.  But an early association between Irish Immigrants and Catholicism led to a tradition of referring to anyone from Notre Dame as Irish.  While the use of the Fighting Irish moniker dates back to the turn of the 20th century, the image of the leprechaun with fists up ready to fight, was only adopted as the official mascot in 1965. The leprechaun logo is typically only used in conjunction with the University’s athletics teams and not with the academic programs.