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In this guest post, Staci Stickovich – Marketing Program Manager of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, introduces us to some of the most sought after events this coming year. And for the first time ever, a special Graduate Student DPAC membership is officially announced! 

 

The DeBartolo Performing Arts Center’s Presenting Series curates a diverse selection of world-class artists in music, theatre, and dance. Notre Dame students are invited to come to any Presenting Series performance for a fraction of the cost of regular ticket prices. Below we’ve highlighted five performances on the upcoming season that you won’t want to miss.
  • Todd Rundgren’s Play Like a Champion Concert: Students Play The ‘80s
    Friday, September 7 at 8 p.m.
    Hailed by many as the “Ultimate Rock Cult Hero,” Rundgren returns to DPAC to kickoff the season. As a songwriter, video pioneer, producer, recording artist, computer software developer, conceptualist, and interactive artist (re-designated TR-i), Rundgren has made a lasting impact on both the form and content of popular music.
  • Aquila Theatre in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
    Thursday & Friday, October 4-5 at 7:30 p.m.
    Part of Operation Frankenstein, Notre Dame’s fall semester celebration of the bicentennial of Mary Shelley’s timeless novel, Aquila Theatre’s production is equal parts boldly thrilling and reverent homage. Stay after the final curtain to discover more about the first true work of science fiction with a member of the cast.
  • Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox
    Saturday, February 2 at 7:30 p.m.
    Who doesn’t want to see a YouTube sensation perform live in-concert? And, if that isn’t reason enough to see them, then perhaps their diverse cast of vocalists, dancers, and musicians remixing Billboard’s top-charting songs in a stunning variety of vintage styles will do the trick. Bradlee’s playful revue dips into a trademark brand of nostalgia that’s hooked legions of fans by “putting pop music in a time machine.”
  • Czech National Symphony Orchestra with John Mauceri, conductor and Isabel Leonard, mezzo-soprano
    Tuesday, March 5 at 7:30 p.m.
    American conductor and former Bernstein protégé John Mauceri teams with mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard to present a celebratory program titled 100 Years of Leonard Bernstein, which culminates in the brilliant Symphonic Dances from West Side Story. See more of the mezzo-soprano during The Met: Live in HD season. She leads the new opera Marnie and Poulenc’s French Revolution tale of refuge and purpose in the face of death Dialogues des Carmélites.
  • An Evening of Chamber Music: Philip Glass, Tim Fain, and Third Coast Percussion
    Saturday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m.
    Regarded as one of the most influential musicians of the late 20th century, American composer Philip Glass joins up-and-coming violinist Tim Fain, and Grammy Award-winning ensemble (former Ensemble-in-Residence at the Center) Third Coast Percussion in an evening of works for solo piano, solo violin, and duets for both musicians. There will also be a series of transformational and inspiring events, including film screenings, happening in conjunction with this performance.

This is just a sample of the season––the highlight reel. We haven’t even mentioned the Tony Award-winning Broadway stars, jazz artists, vocal ensemble, or ballet studio company also performing. To see the complete list of Presenting Series artists and other events happening at the Center, check out our website. Whether you’re an arts aficionado, expanding your cultural horizons, looking to be inspired, or want nothing more than to be entertained––there’s truly something for everyone to enjoy at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

Special Offer from DPAC for Graduate Students

Last spring, the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC) surveyed students to learn more about arts engagement on campus. Findings showed that 71% of graduate student respondents were interested in a DPAC membership program. As a result, we’re offering a pilot program for graduate students and their spouses that allows members to pay an initial price for tickets to any ticketed performance or film screening during the season (exclusions may apply).

Because this is a new program, the introductory membership price is only $50 per person per season. Anyone interested in learning more about the program can contact the DPAC Ticket Office at 574-631-2800 or via email at performingarts@nd.edu.

In this guest post, Mandy Havert, Digital Research and Outreach Librarian in charge of Graduate Outreach Services, shares how to make the most of your Hesburgh Library experience. 

As a new graduate student or returning student at Notre Dame, you will find the Hesburgh Libraries has a lot to offer. Begin by checking out this guide for getting started with Hesburgh Libraries before you come to campus: https://resources.library.nd.edu/documents/faculty-checklist.pdf  Once you have a campus network login – your NetID – you will be able to sign in and customize your library account. This includes being able to monitor the status of materials you have borrowed from our local collections or materials you have requested from other libraries.

In addition to our materials and collections, take a look at people and events in the Hesburgh Libraries. We have over 30 subject librarians located throughout campus to help you become familiar with what’s available to you, and to keep you up-to-date on how the libraries can support your research. You are able to request purchases for our collections, and if you develop a working relationship with your librarian, he or she will be able to anticipate what’s important for your research. Contact information for our subject librarians is available to you from our directory page: https://directory.library.nd.edu/directory, Visit this page to learn about campus locations for the Hesburgh Libraries: https://library.nd.edu/hesburgh-floor-maps#

The “Events” section of the library home page is regularly updated and includes information about special events, exhibitions, and workshops. Be sure to check our events listings regularly. The Graduate Student Newsletter also includes information on these and other events and is  delivered right to your mailbox!

Workshops held by the libraries range from learning ways to add to your citation and research management skills to conducting archival research. Digital scholarship workshops are offered by our Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship. Regular workshops include beginner and intermediate sessions for building your professional web presence, how to use geographical information systems, working with data and statistics, and text mining. You can register for workshops using the Hesburgh Libraries Workshop Calendar: http://nd.libcal.com/calendar/allworkshops/?cid=447&t=m&d=0000-00-00&cal=447

If you’re not sure where to start, you can reach out to the Graduate Student Services librarian, Mandy Havert – mhavert@nd.edu, to ask questions and receive some tips on how to get the most out of  the Hesburgh Libraries. Mandy will fill you in on regular events, such as our weeklong Dissertation Camps, and regularly scheduled Dissertation Day Camps.

 

Life and Living Well

I’ll begin by stating the obvious: grad school is hard.

As graduate students, we are familiar with the toil of prioritizing and accomplishing our to-do lists. But grad student to-do lists grow faster than grad students can work. We’ve always got a nagging feeling that we ought to be doing something productive right now.

Part of what helps us tolerate long hours of labor and high expectations is knowing that it’s temporary. Only a few years of suffering; then comes the really meaningful work. We’ll land the job we desire, and then our life can really begin.

But we spend so much of our lives in this mindset. As an undergrad, we looked forward to grad school – that’s when I’ll finally get to do what I really want! And as high-schoolers, we looked forward to college – finally, a chance to be out on my own!

And then Master Yoda suddenly pokes us in our (metaphorical) ribs: “All his life has he looked away – to the future – to the horizon! Never his mind on where he was! Hm? What he was doing! Hmph. Adventure – heh! Excitement – heh! A Jedi craves not these things.” (The Empire Strikes Back) And somehow, in the words of a weird, shrivel-faced puppet, we recognize the truth: we can spend our whole lives looking forward to the next thing, believing that our life hasn’t begun yet.

But the fact is – it has. Life isn’t in the future. It’s happening right now.

And if life has meaning, it must be somewhere in the present. It must be here and now: in the friends and neighbors who, by chance or providence, surround us; in our own hearts and spirits, calling us to pay attention, to look – to really look! – and to listen – to really listen! Our life may not be what we’d like – but it is – it exists. And that’s good.

Work hard, then, but don’t be deceived – the meaning of your life isn’t all in what you produce. It’s in your relationships. It’s in who you are.

Listen to people. Bless them and tell the truth with humility. Don’t rush. Stop. See the living world around you. The beauty of it all is that life’s not useful- it’s just good. It’s all the gift of God, who didn’t need to create anything at all.

But he did. He willed the world to be. And he willed you to live so that he can love you. He’s already given you all that’s necessary for happiness, free, no strings. It’s there if only you have eyes to see – if you only ask him.

Trust God’s love. Hear his voice. Enjoy his grace. He is the meaning in the present moment. He is the Beauty in the beautiful. He is the Goodness in all that’s good.

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As graduate students, we spend much of our energy on one activity – writing. The quantity and quality of our writing is, in many fields, the benchmark by which we are evaluated by colleagues. The greater the volume of the writing we produce, and the more citations it receives, the more distinguished grows our reputation.

We’ll leave aside the perturbing questions that this reality should raise, and state the obvious: writing is the centerpiece of a graduate student’s career, whether it’s our dissertation, a class presentation, a journal article, or a conference talk.

Many of us find ourselves alone as we wade into this morass of words and ideas, relying on a combination of calendar and willpower to forge ahead. In these trackless swamps, however, procrastination is ever at hand and our thoughts and expressions tend to curl inwards until we find ourselves in an echo chamber of our own making.

Our mistake is to think that writing is a solo expedition, a way to express ourselves, but it’s more than that. Writing is a relationship. It’s about articulating the truth so that it can become somebody else’s too – and the words that we think best express our thoughts may not be as successful as we suppose. There’s only one way to tell, and that’s to get feedback. Equally helpful is having a companion in our toil to encourage us and, at times, prod us into making progress.

Each of these aspects of composition – communication, feedback, and accountability – happen in the context of community, a world far larger and richer than any dissertation or article. The academy may evaluate you on the basis of words produced, but the real font of meaningful living lies deeper – in friendship, the very heart of human flourishing.

Grad Life’s Writing Accountability Groups program is about building just such a community of writers. The premise is simple: you and your colleagues form a writing group for the purposes of keeping each other accountable in your work and providing one another feedback, and Grad Life gives you money – up to $10 per person per month – so that you can enjoy snacks and coffee or tea together. The community is yours. We just help with the cash.

For the full details, additional guidance, and to register your own group, check out the Writing Accountability Groups webpage on the Grad Life website.

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Have you and your grad student friends ever wanted to go to an event, but couldn’t quite bring yourselves to fork over the cash to pay for it? Next time, Grad Life may be able to help!

One of Grad Life’s ongoing programs is the GO Grant program, sponsored by the Notre Dame Graduate School. Groups of current Notre Dame graduate students and post-docs (and their guests) can apply for a GO Grant to help cover the cost of tickets or entrance fees to events around Michiana. If you have a group of six to twelve graduate students (and up to one guest for each student) collectively coming from at least two different academic departments, you’re eligible to apply for up to $300.00 per group to help subsidize the cost of the event you have in mind. This program is meant to support graduate student participation in local events in order to promote well-being and foster community.

All you have to do is fill out a short online application with a description of the event and a brief argument for why your group should receive funding for it. Eligibility requirements and other policies are spelled out in full on the Grad Life website, but here are the basics.

  • The money can only be used to cover the cost of tickets or entrance fees to one-time events – it is not for covering the cost of food, beverages, alcohol, transportation, recurring classes, etc.
  • Submit your application at least one week ahead of time, since every participant will need to fill out and submit a waiver form.
  • It’s okay if the total cost of the event will exceed $300 – you can use the GO Grant as a subsidy.
  • No applicant or attendee may be the beneficiary of a GO Grant more than once a semester. If you were part of a group that received a GO Grant in January, you can’t be part of a group that receives a grant for the rest of the spring. Check the website for specific dates.
  • Only adults (over 18) are eligible to receive funding.
  • Afterwards, your group will need to submit your receipts, a short survey, and a photo of the group at the event in order to receive reimbursement.

It’s as simple as that! So next time you and your friends feel like fleeing the library and getting some recreation, you can think less about cash and more about fun. Apply now!

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As I write, rain is pouring down outside. The weather has reached 60 degrees, the first sure sign that winter is coming to an end. I expect that the cold will return, but the seasons are surely turning. All of this water will soon swell into blossom on trees across campus and the arc of the Sun across the sky will slowly expand and render the days mild and warm once more.

More good news: the new Graduate Student Lounge in Duncan Student Center is now a frequent haunt of the reclusive and perpetually-working graduate student. It has become something of a natural habitat for this strange species, thanks mainly to large windows, comfy chairs, and an abundance of one of its primary sources of energy: coffee (to say nothing of peanut butter sandwiches). Time has certainly confirmed my opinion that the Lounge is the best space in Duncan – there is just something about the sunlit ambience, the colors of the furnishings, and the smell of coffee brewing that makes it possible to rest, even while studying.

The space is far from perfect, of course. At lunchtime and after five o’clock, fitness classes begin in the gym directly above. All of the electric outlets are now functional, though the lockers remain half-assembled. And yes, the occasional stray (or unscrupulous) undergraduate does make off with a peanut butter sandwich.

All in all, however, the Lounge is a pleasant place. Importantly, it is our place – not a home, perhaps, but a space nevertheless to which we belong.

Welcome.

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It’s deep winter in Michiana. The sky is cloudy, your fingers are numb, and the latest glacial air mass has transformed our campus into a winter wonder-if-I’ll-live-to-see-grass-again-land. Rumor even has it that woolly mammoths migrating from Canada have been spotted outside the city!

At times like these, only one thing can warm your frosty innards: food, delicious and piping hot. We’ve already given you some good suggestions on where to find it in previous posts (see especially this one on cheap restaurants) so today’s will focus on eight Mishawaka restaurants not previously featured on Ask the Salmon or on the Grad Life website.

So lash your sled dogs together and zip on your snow pants. It’s time to dine!

Diner on 12th
1212 E. 12th St.
Website

This little diner has sandwiches, burgers, hot dogs, pizza, and baskets on the menu, all of them as cheap as they come. They are particularly known for serving a life-changing ham sandwich.

Pasquale Rulli’s
904 Division St.
Website

Reasonably-price, family-owned, authentic Italian diner. What more do you need to know? Not to be confused with Sam & Mary Rulli’s Pizza in Elkhart.

OneFourteen
114 Lincolnway East
Website

A modern gastro-pub serving hand-crafted burgers, sandwiches, salads, and sides, all made with fresh ingredients. The best news? It doesn’t come at a premium in price.

Taste of Asia
5327 N. Main St.
Website

Chinese and Thai food for dining in and taking out. No frills, low prices–but delicious.

Oliva’s Bar & Restaurant
327 Union St.
Website

Family-run Italian-American diner open for lunch and dinner. Check out their daily specials!

Macadoo’s Family Restaurant
2108 Lincolnway East
Website

An unpretentious American diner known for its breakfast and brunch, especially for biscuits and gravy.

Kristin’s Cafe
303 E. 4th St.
Website

Another hole-in-the-wall American breakfast diner serving up large portions at low prices.

Scoobie’s
223 N. Main St.
Website

Rock-bottom prices for a delicious, American-style lunch and dinner–sandwiches, burgers, pizza, pasta, and more. “Get Toasted at Scoobz!”

As always, check out the Grad Life website and TripAdvisor for more restaurant suggestions in South Bend, Mishawaka, Granger, and beyond. And don’t worry: spring is only two months away!

 

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Grad Life’s New Home and the Graduate Student Lounge

As winter break comes to a close, I’d like to invite you on Grad Life’s behalf to visit us in our new space on the south side of the Duncan Student Center’s second floor. Over winter break, Grad Life moved from a small space in the back rooms of the Main Building to a brand new office overlooking Legends and the Stadium Lot. This office is the new home of both Grad Life and the GSU.

Our office also looks into a stupendous lounge intended just for graduate students! The lounge, arguably the best spot in Duncan, has a wall of windows facing DeBartolo Hall and is filled with comfortable couches and chairs (including two rockers!) and tables for studying. There are also a number of day lockers, as well as a small kitchen area for graduate student use, which includes a sink, microwaves, free coffee, and, in case you forgot your lunch, supplies for making peanut butter sandwiches. The lounge’s conference room will also soon be available for reservation.

You can come check out the new lounge and our office during the official Duncan Student Center Open House on Monday, January 15, from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm. For more information on Duncan, see the university press release regarding its grand opening.

Smith Center for Recreational Sports

One of the new student center’s star attractions is the Smith Center for Recreational Sports, which will be fully operational on January 15. The entrance to the Smith Center is on the third floor, but is only accessible from the stairwell and elevators on the north side of Duncan. Upon entering, you’ll find yourself on the main floor of the Center, among dozens of state-of-the-art treadmills, ellipticals, and other cardio machines, most of them with individual monitors. On either end of the long room, you will also find fitness and personal training rooms, a basketball court, locker rooms, weight machines, a free weight area, and the SYNRGY 360 system, which amounts to an adult jungle gym with TRX resistance-training capabilities.

On the fourth floor, accessible from two stairwells inside the Smith Center, there is a 1/6 mile track with areas for stretching and numerous additional cardio machines and lockers, as well as another jungle-gym type apparatus. The Smith Center also boasts a climbing wall and a bouldering wall, both of which can be reached by a separate entrance on the second floor of Duncan.

There is much more to see in the new student center, however, so come take a look for yourself.

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It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas! Or perhaps it will once this week and next have passed, with all the intensity of final projects.

And blessings on your winter break. Rest is a wonderful thing: treasure it while you have the time. Be present to those whom you love. Eat good food and take time to do what you enjoy. These things, in the end, are more important than what we are doing at school. Our career is only a part of who we are, and that part changes throughout our lives. But fellowship – leisure – delight – these go to the heart of being the human person you are.

Grace and peace be with you in this Christmas season. May the God and Father of all people touch your heart with joy.

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This is the last in our series of blog posts on living on a graduate student budget in South Bend. We’ve covered grocery stores, movies, local thrift stores, and restaurants, and past posts have featured such under-utilized money-saving resources as the local public library and the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Check out these and other posts on Ask the Salmon for tips on saving cash in Michiana.

In this post I want to draw your attention to one of the best ways to save money if you are a married graduate student: the spousal ID card offered by the Graduate School (Business, Architecture, and Engineering students will have to contact their administrative assistants for information specific to their schools).

Current graduate students who are married can get their spouse a Notre Dame ID card by filling out the form on this webpage and submitting a scan or copy of their marriage certificate per the instructions. After that, there is a $5 fee for the card itself, and then your spouse has access to at least five on-campus services (though individual departments and programs may choose to extend access to additional services–talk to your department’s administrative assistant).

These services are as follows:

(1) Access to all student activity events and student-only events at Legends.
(2) Free entry to all RecSports facilities. Who needs a gym membership? Your spouse can even take fitness classes! (3) Access to the university library system, including the ability to request and check out books. Instead of logging into their library account with a NetID, spouses use the NDID number on their ID card.
(4) The ability to use Domer Dollars and to load a meal plan onto the card.
(5) Free transportation on all Transpo buses. This is a perk for all who have a Notre Dame ID card. Just show the bus driver your card when you get on, and you’re off! This makes getting around South Bend a whole lot easier for those with transportation restrictions. Check out the Transpo website for schedules and routes.

And now you know! All of this is available to spouses for the very reasonable fee of $5. Don’t pass it up.

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