Arduino Workshops at Notre Dame

IMG_0679 Arduino is an open source physical computing platform that allows you to interact with the physical world from your computer. As an open source platform, Arduino focuses on sharing knowledge and ideas between makers. It is an affordable option that can be used with many operating systems. Experienced hobbyists can extend and improve upon the system as they use it in projects, and beginners have an inexpensive way to start experimenting with the technology. Incorporating electronics and simplified microcontroller programming through Arduino creates a unique opportunity for innovative solutions to real-world challenges.

 

“With Arduino, communities can come together to solve the problems they are facing,” said Matt Willmore, who coordinated a two-day workshop on Arduino programming basics for the Notre Dame community at Innovation Park. The sold-out event had fifty participants. Each participant received an Arduino clone kit that included the board, breadboard, wires, transmitters, and a remote. The workshop was sponsored by AT&T and SAP, so attendees only had to pay a $20 fee for the cost of their Arduino clone kit.

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“The events we have held were very successful, and we are looking to hold additional workshops in the future,” Matt says.

In addition to repeating the Arduino basics class, Matt hopes to have follow up events that build upon the introductory workshop. Future classes may include a workshop geared towards families and advanced classes focusing on programming and hardware. Keep a look out for additional Arduino events at Notre Dame this summer and fall.

Horizon Report 2015: Notre Dame and the Digital Horizon

In February, the Hesburgh Library Center for Digital Scholarship hosted the Horizon Report 2015 Event: Notre Dame and the Digital Horizon, which looked at emerging technological trends and how they will affect teaching, learning, and creative inquiry at Notre Dame over the next three to five years.  The Horizon Report is published annually, in collaboration with the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The event was a collaboration with the Hesburgh Libraries, the Kaneb Center, OIT, and the Office of Digital Learning. It consisted of a welcome lunch followed by lightening talks that focused on:

 

Online Learning

The value of online learning is now well understood and set to impact education with its flexibility, ease of access, and integration of sophisticated learning technologies. How can Notre Dame use online tools to enhance the excellent education we already provide?

 

Badges / Blending of formal and informal learning

Badges allow for reward incentive and progress monitoring with online learning. Incentives like this are increasingly prevalent with blended learning environments. The term flipped classroom refers to a pedagogical model where the in-class time with students is primarily focused on problem solving activities, rather than presentation of information.  The prerequisite information is reviewed by students prior to coming to class.  Many classrooms are being flipped in an attempt to integrate active learning. Blending this with traditional lectures promotes hands on, real world application of concepts that foster curiosity-based learning among students.

 

Data-Driven Learning and Assessment

Online applications and tools generate a lot of data as faculty and students use them.  Universities around the world are developing tools to help analyze the data in ways that can help us understand and predict student success or failure.  Learning progress can be monitored through data analytics services, providing a more personalized learning experience.

 

Makerspaces

Makerspaces are workshops that offer the tools needed to carry out ideas from start to finish.  These tools often include traditional shop tools used in woodworking, but they also include newer technologies conducive to rapid prototyping such as 3D printers, laser-cutters, and CNC machines. Makerspaces help students develop critical skills in design, engineering, and creativity, preparing for their careers.

 

Bring-your-own-device

Many institutions and organizations are supporting the use of personal devices. Students and educators are bringing their own devices into the classroom and connecting them to the University’s network.

 

Understanding the findings of the Horizon Report is important for the Notre Dame community.  These trends are set to have great impact on teaching and learning in the coming years. Implementing them properly and understanding their impact will prepare our students for the future.


Hackathon 2014

This weekend, stop by Innovation Park on Angela Blvd for the Notre Dame AT&T Hackathon. This free event will be running from Friday, September 26th at 6:00 PM to Sunday, September 28th at 12:00 PM.

 

The Hackathon will assist attendees in deploying their own apps through presentations, code samples, and technical tips. Food will be served, and cash prizes will be awarded for the best Hackathon App, and the best use of an AT&T API.
This event is a great opportunity to network and fine tune your development skills. All are welcome to attend. For more information, or to register for the event, click here.