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CM Reacts

CECELIA LYNCH AND CILAS KEMEDJIO

The CIHA blog calls for sharing of experiences, wisdom, emotional and action-oriented responses to the recent election. Read the full article »

ROSEMARY KELLISON

Tension can be productive. Certainly, there are resources even within the just war tradition itself on which those interested in promoting the development of peacebuilding practices might draw. In addition to the practice of including more participants from areas and groups historically excluded from Church conferences and conversations, the maintenance of these competing views of the moral status of modernity may thus be a means of facilitating dialogue and new development within the Catholic community itself. Read the full article »

JOHN KELSAY

These conversations are worth noting because they reinforced for me two convictions: first, that there is a great deal to be said regarding the role of nonviolent modes of addressing human conflict, a topic often neglected by interpreters of the just war tradition; and second, that severing the notions of just peace and just war, for example by setting aside the vocabulary of jus ad bellum and jus in bello is a mistake. Indeed, I think we should combine these, and thus affirm that the notions of just peace and just war go together. Read the full article »

From Just War to Just Peace?

LISA SOWLE CAHILL

Whether or not one approves rare and stringently specified uses of violent force to protect democratic institutions and human security, all Catholics, and counterparts in other traditions, should prioritize practical initiatives to transform conflicts and expand just peace. Read the full article »

USAMA HASAN

In a theme that resonates well with Contending Modernities, Khan has consistently spoken of his (and everyone’s) multiple identities, in his case these being: British, European, Western, Pakistani-origin, Muslim, human rights lawyer, the son of a bus driver and a product of a working-class council estate home. Thus, Khan’s election has the potential to be hugely inspiring and empowering to “minority” or “underdog” groupings, like Barack Obama’s election victory in 2008. Read the full article »

MYRIAM FRANÇOIS

London began this past balmy weekend with the news that Sadiq Khan has been elected Mayor of London in a landslide victory–achieving the biggest personal mandate of any politician in UK history.

“Victory for Sadiq Khan highlights tolerant face of London,” says the Financial Times. Indeed, despite some efforts to present Sadiq as a secret Al-Qaeda-supporting fanatic out to impose public beheadings south of the London Eye, Londoners–or at least 57 per cent of them–do not seem to have bought into the idea that Khan is in fact a secret extremist. Read the full article »

HAMID DABASHI

There is no doubt the election of Sadiq Khan is a momentous occasion, a shock to the xenophobic fear-mongering flooding Europe from the UK to Greece. But we should not fetishize the fact that he is a Muslim, but rather celebrate the tenacity of a working-class immigrant family to raise a child with the audacity to imagine himself running such a magnificent city. His Muslim background and demeanor, his family's Muslim names, his use of the Qur’an in his official ceremonies, all signal a significant symbolic register in European self-consciousness: Muslims are here, and are here to stay. Read the full article »