Participants

Amanda Bryan is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Loyola University Chicago. Her research and teaching interests include the federal judiciary, especially the US Supreme Court, judicial decision-making, and quantitative methodology. Her research examines how justices make decisions under various internal and external constraints. She is especially interested in the effect of public opinion on judicial decision-making, how the Supreme Court sets its agenda, and measuring legal development and jurisprudence. Her work has appeared in Political Research Quarterly, American Politics Research, and Justice System Journal.
Bryce J. Dietrich is Assistant Professor of Social Science Informatics at the University of Iowa. His research uses novel quantitative, automated, and machine learning methods to analyze non-traditional data sources such as audio (or speech) data and video data. He uses these techniques to understand the causes and consequences of elite emotional expressions in a variety of institutional settings, with a particular emphasis on non-verbal cues, such as vocal pitch. His work has been published in Political Psychology.
Adam Dynes is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Brigham Young University. He researches legislative behavior with an interest in representation, political psychology, distributive politics, and political parties. In examining these topics, he has studied U.S. elected officials at the national, state, and local levels using surveys, observational data, and experimental methods. Some of this work has been published in the American Political Science Review and the American Journal of Political Science. He is also the co-principal investigator of the American Municipal Official Survey. He is also associated with the Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy at BYU and the Laboratories of Democracy, a non-profit research organization of political scientists that collaborates with local and state officials on field experimental research.
Matthew E. K. Hall is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. He specializes in American political institutions with an emphasis on judicial behavior and policy implementation. His book, The Nature of Supreme Court Power (Cambridge University Press, 2011), won the C. Herman Pritchett Award for Best Book on Law and Courts from the American Political Science Association. He has also published numerous articles in leading journals, including the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of PoliticsPolitical AnalysisPublic Opinion Quarterly, and the Journal of Law and Courts. He is currently pursuing a variety of research projects, including (1) the role of personality traits in shaping judicial behavior and (2) the influence of institutional design on representation in the American states.
Hans J. G. Hassell is Assistant Professor of Politics at Cornell College. His research focuses on political institutions and specifically on political parties and their role in electoral politics. In particular, he studies the role of parties in shaping the field of candidates and controlling the outcomes of political primaries and nominations for the US House and Senate. He is also interested in how the contextual political environment, especially aspects such as race, ethnicity, and immigration, shape political behaviors and outcomes. Some of this work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and Political Behavior. He is author of The Party’s Primary: Control of Congressional Nominations (Cambridge University Press, 2018). He is also associated with Laboratories of Democracy, a non-profit research organization of political scientists that collaborates with local and state officials on field experimental research and he has also acted as a co-principal investigator of the 2016 American Municipal Official Survey.
Matthew V. Hibbing is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Merced. He studies American politics with a focus on political behavior, political psychology and the influence of biology on mass politics. His research centers on individual-level predispositions that shape political attitudes and behaviors, including personality and physiological traits, and it has published in a number of journals, including Science, the American Political Science Review, the British Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Political Behavior, and Political Psychology.
Gary E. Hollibaugh, Jr. is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. He specializes in American political institutions with an emphasis on the relationship between the executive and legislative branches, as well as the importance of elite personality within institutions. He is coauthor of More Than a Feeling: Personality, Polarization, and the Transformation of the U.S. Congress (University of Chicago Press, 2017), which leverages insights from political science, personality psychology, neuropsychology, experimental economics, computational linguistics, and machine learning to develop a framework for incorporating elite personality traits into formal and informal models of political institutions. His work has been published in the discipline’s leading journals, including the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, the Journal of Theoretical Politics, and others.
Kristin Kanthak is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh. Her work focuses on the effects of exogenous constraints on political representation. Her work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, and others, and she is the co-author with George A. Krause of The Diversity Paradox: Political Parties, Legislatures, and the Organizational Foundations of Representation in America (Oxford University Press, 2012). She is currently the co-editor of State Politics and Policy Quarterly.
Jonathan D. Klingler is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Political Science at Vanderbilt University. His research interests lie at the meeting place of political behavior and political institutions, and he is engaged in a major project to incorporate the Five Factor Model of personality into the study of elected officials. He is also working on projects to examine how, if at all, politicians pursue their office and policy objectives by maintaining personal grassroots lobbying organizations between elections. His research has been published in the Australian Journal of Political Science, Political Science Research and Methods, and Armed Forces and Society, and he is coauthor of More Than a Feeling: Personality, Polarization, and the Transformation of the U.S. Congress (University of Chicago Press, 2017).
Matthew R. Miles is Associate Professor of Political Science at Brigham Young University, Idaho. His primary research agenda explores the interaction between individual traits and institutional arrangements. He wants to know how institutions shape individual attitudes and how our genetic makeup influences our core set of political beliefs.  His research has been published in Politics and Religion, Policy Studies Journal, Political Research Quarterly, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and others.
Jeffery J. Mondak is James M. Benson Chair in Public Issues and Civic Leadership and Associate Head for Graduate Programs in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Nothing to Read: Newspapers and Elections in a Social Experiment (University of Michigan Press, 1995) and Personality and the Foundations of Political Behavior (Cambridge University Press, 2010), as well as co-editor of Fault Lines: Why the Republicans Lost Congress (Routledge, 2009). His articles appear in outlets including the American Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, Cognitive Brain Research, the Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, and others. He has received awards for his research from the American Association for Public Opinion Research, the American Political Science Association and the Midwest Political Science Association.
Carl Palmer is Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics and Government at Illinois State University. His research examines how individual characteristics and predispositions interact with social stimuli to shape political behavior. Using experiment​al methods, he examines how social identity, stereotypes, personality, and the accessibility of these attitudes condition the manner in which citizens respond to the political world around them.​ His research has been published in the Journal of Politics, Politics, Groups, and Identities, and others.
Lior Sheffer is a Political Science PhD student at the University of Toronto. He studies elite political behavior and his research focuses on executive decision making, and he looks at whether and how people who run for office differ from non-politicians when they solve problems and reason about the policy choices they have to make. He conducts behavioral experiments with incumbent politicians as participants, across different contexts and countries. He is especially interested in politicians’ risk-taking, and looks at how factors like experience and in-office accountability affect risk preferences and other features of decision making. His work has been published in Electoral Studies.
Jo Silvester is Professor of Psychology and Deputy Dean at Cass Business School, City University of London. Her research investigates diversity and leadership emergence, performance in political roles, and politicians’ shared understanding of effective political leadership. Her work applies theory and research from organizational psychology to politicians and political work, with the aim of improving support for the selection and development of political leaders. Recent projects sponsored by central and local government, political parties, and the Economic and Social Research Council include studies of the impact of party selection procedures on diversity of prospective parliamentary candidates, and the learning and socialization of newly elected political leaders. Her research has been published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Human Relations, the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, the International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the British Journal of PsychologyPolitical Behavior, and others. She has been an Associate Editor for the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.
Justin Wedeking is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Kentucky. His areas of specialization are judicial behavior and decision making, judicial process, oral arguments, Supreme Court confirmation hearings, and the role of courts in American society. Secondary areas include text analysis, public opinion, political psychology, and political participation. His research has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Law & Society Review, the Journal of Law and Courts, and others.  He has also coauthored three books: Oral Arguments and Coalition on the U.S. Supreme Court: A Deliberate Dialogue (University of Michigan Press, 2012), Supreme Court Confirmation Hearings in the U.S. Senate: Reconsidering the Charade (University of Michigan Press, 2014), and U.S. Supreme Court Opinions and Their Audiences (Cambridge University Press, 2016).