IUSB-Civil Rights Heritage Center Announces Fall-2017 Semester Film Series

A monthly series of film and discussion on issues that matter.

SEP. 5: I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO: JAMES BALDWIN & RACE IN AMERICA

Oscar-nominated “I Am Not Your Negro” explores the continued peril America faces from institutionalized racism. Based on an unfinished manuscript Baldwin began in 1979, “Remember This House,” which was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends—Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.—filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book that Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America using Baldwin’s original words and a flood of rich archival material. “I Am Not Your Negro” is a journey into Black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter.

OCT. 3: OUR SPIRITS DON’T SPEAK ENGLISH: INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL

This film examines an educational system that was designed to destroy American Indian culture and tribal unity. The film offers a candid look at the Indian Boarding School system that existed from 1879 through the 1960s. The School attempted to, as one of the founders stated, “Kill the Indian and save the man.” Combining personal interviews with historical narration and featuring powerful interviews with people such as Andrew Windy Boy and Grace Thorpe (daughter of noted Sauk and Fox athlete Jim Thorpe), this film reflects the harrowing and often untold experience suffered by many Native Americans.

NOV. 7: ALMOST SUNRISE

Almost Sunrise follows two Iraq veterans, Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson, both tormented by depression for years after they returned home and pushed to the edge of suicide. The two embark on an extraordinary journey—a 2,700 mile walk across the country from Wisconsin to California in order to reflect on their haunting experiences of war, and to ultimately save themselves.

Will this epic pilgrimage allow them to begin the new life they so desperately seek?

DEC. 5: DOLORES

Dolores Huerta is among the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century—and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change. From Executive Producer Carlos Santana and directed by Peter Bratt, this award winning film is in limited release around the United States.

Dates, times, and events are subject to change. For the most recent information, visit crhc.iusb.edu.

6pm to 8pm

Civil Rights Heritage Center
1040 West Washington
South Bend, IN 46601

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Civil Rights Heritage Center

1040 West Washington Street

South BendIN 46601

Author: Leslie L Morgan

Leslie serves as the Africana Studies and Education Librarian within the Hesburgh Libraries.