Recruitment for the Black Book Interactive: Extending the Reach, Scholars program

It gives me great pleasure to inform you that the BBIP-ER (Black Book Interactive Project: Extending the Reach) Scholars Program applications are finally up on our website. Thanks to the ACLS Grant we received in 2018, we are trying to recruit scholars, teachers, library/museum professionals, and independent scholars to contribute to our project of building a workable archive of African American Novels using their own ideas and personalized projects as stepping stones. These projects will be an investigation into some aspect of African American literature utilizing the BBIP-ER database and interface.  Successful applicants will be paid a stipend of $2,275 and will have access to an in-house DH consultant (including some of you) to guide them.  

It would be immensely helpful if you could spread the word, and forward the link and the flier that we are attaching with this mail to your various networks. The deadline for application submissions is January 22, 2019.  Further information is available once you click on the provided links.

Here is the link to our page: http://bbip.ku.edu/

Here is the link to the application: http://bbip.ku.edu/sites/bbip.ku.edu/files/files/BBIP-ER-ScholarProgramApplication.pdf

Sincerely,
Arnab Chakraborty

PhD Student, Department of English

Project Manager, The Black Book Interactive Project

University of Kansas

Dear Faculty & Students at the University of Notre Dame:
We are reaching again out to invite you in hopes of creating a collective celebration of radical Black Love!  The main event will be a Frederick Douglass Day Read-A-Thon to take place on his birthday, February 14, 2019. Our event will also be part of the year-long commemorations marking 400 years since the first documented arrival of Africans who came to English America (https://bit.ly/2PVt6j3).
Unlike more traditional read-a-thons that serve as contests, this one will involve people reading among themselves (like a book club or a class) AS WELL AS joining our “main event” happening in Philadelphia, via Live Stream.
We hope that Faculty & Students in partnership with your Africana Studies Librarian will have the opportunity to join the live-stream of the program, which will include a live performance of Douglass’ speech. It does not matter where your group is located. You can join us from anywhere! And if you’re up for it, your reading group can also call in to be on the live stream. This will be both a learning event and a party!
 
READINGS
The two required readings for our Read-A-Thon will be:
 
Title: Address to the National Convention of Colored Men, Louisville Kentucky
Author:  Frederick Douglass
Published: September 24, 1883
 
Title: Anna Murray Douglass, My Mother As I Recall Her 
Author:  Rosetta Douglass Sprague (daughter of Anna and Frederick)
Published: May 10, 1900
 
Groups can join us online first and then leave the virtual space for their own reading/discussion activity.  For this part of the event, a short excerpt from Douglass’ Address, or the essay by Sprague, could be read by the group and discussed. We will provide prompts to get the discussion going. The online portion that will happen earlier will provide the historical background needed for the discussions that will be done  by the various groups.  
If your networks include groups you think would be interested in participating, please share this information and tell them to  to contact me.
Best, Curtis Small
On behalf of the Colored Conventions Project team
Curtis Small, Jr. (he/him/his)

Senior Assistant Librarian Coordinator, Public Services

Special Collections Department
University of Delaware Library
181 South College Avenue
Newark, Delaware 19717

Phone: 302-831-6518
Fax: 302-831-1046
e-mail: csmalljr@udel.edu

News from Art Library Deco: The “Our Story” Digitization Project at the Atlanta University Center – Webinar~Register Today

ART Library Deco

ourstory

Date: Thursday, November 15, 2:00-3:00 pm EST
 
Cost:  FREE to all

Speakers:

Aletha Moore, Digitization Project Manager, Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library
Holly Smith, Archivist, Spelman College
Christine Wiseman, Head Digital Services, Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library
 
Register Here:

https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/c4f3867aaa884454809073a282ce7dc0

The Conservation of Dante’s 1477 Divine Comedy: Lecture this Afternoon in Rare Books & Special Collections 3pm-4pm

About the Presenter
Jeff Peachey is an independent book conservator and toolmaker based in New York City. For more than 25 years, he has specialized in the conservation of books for institutions and individuals. He is a Professional Associate in the American Institute for Conservation, has taught book conservation workshops internationally, and was recently awarded fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center (Italy) and Rochester Institute of Technology’s Cary Collection (New York). He is a Visiting Instructor for the Library and Archives Conservation Education Consortium (LACE) of Buffalo State University, New York University, and the Winterthur/ University of Delaware. “Ausbund 1564: The History and Conservation of an Anabaptist Icon” is his latest publication. He grew up in Goshen, Indiana, and is a proud graduate of Goshen College.

Peachey will share the journey of conservation through an illustrated lecture. Bibliophiles, conservators, librarians, scholars of Italian Studies, and anyone curious about the history of books and literature will find this lecture of interest. Highlights include:
Evidence uncovered during treatment, suggesting the Inferno and Purgatory cantiche may have circulated separately at one point, will be explored. Differences between historic 15th-century binding practices and modern conservation binding techniques will be highlighted, as will the sometimes problematic differences between historic and modern materials. An overview of functional and aesthetic considerations for conservation rebinding will conclude the lecture.

Hesburgh Libraries’ Zahm Dante Collection bolsters Notre Dame’s globally recognized program in Italian Studies. One of the most important volumes of the collection is its earliest printing of Dante’s Divine Comedy, produced in 1477 in Venice by Wendelin of Speyer.

Ensuring meaningful access to and use of rare and early imprints by faculty and students for research is a goal for the Hesburgh Libraries conservation and preservation efforts. Age and frequent use demands for this volume mandated restoration work. To undertake this significant treatment, the Libraries enlisted the specialized skills of accomplished conservator, Jeff Peachey.

University of Notre Dame: Center for Social Concerns-Higgins Labor Program, Fall-2018 Events

Fall 2018 Events: 

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK:

Friday, August 31, 5pm, Geddes Coffee House

Topic: Scratch your Labor Day itch by discussing what’s on your mind about the world of work

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

LUNCHTIME LABOR RAPS (Research, Advocacy, & Policy Series)

Friday, September 7, 12:30 pm, Geddes Hall Coffeehouse

“Negotiating the Future of Work: Reflections and Predictions from a Veteran Labor Lawyer”

Tuck Hopkins, ND ‘74, retired attorney from Barnes & Thornburg

Higgins Lunchtime Labor RAPS feature experts—scholars, activists, and policymakers—exploring the past, present, and future of work, in the U.S. and beyond. All Notre Dame community members are welcome, and lunch is provided for those who RSVP here.

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK

Friday, September 21, 4:30pm, Geddes Coffee House

Topic: Book Discussion of Luis Alberto Urrea’s The Devil’s Highway, a haunting account of undocumented immigrants, coyotes, and border agents

**Note the special time and format: This is part of the Center for Social Concerns’ book read in anticipation of Urrea’s campus visit on Oct. 2@5pm, in McKenna Hall. Interested in participating and want a free copy of the book? Contact the Higgins Labor Program.

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

​LUNCHTIME LABOR RAPS (Research, Advocacy, & Policy Series)

Friday, September 28, 12:30 pm, Geddes Hall Coffeehouse

“Global Unions, Strategic Campaigns: Worker Solidarity in the Age of Amazon”

Tim Beaty, ND ‘79, Director of Global Strategies, International Brotherhood of Teamsters

Higgins Lunchtime Labor RAPS feature experts—scholars, activists, and policymakers—exploring the past, present, and future of work, in the U.S. and beyond. All Notre Dame community members are welcome, and lunch is provided for those who RSVP here.

 

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK

Friday, October 26, 5pm, Geddes Hall Coffee House

Topic: TBD

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

CHUCK CRAYPO MEMORIAL SERIES: ECONOMICS, INSTITUTIONS, POWER, and SOCIAL CHANGE:
2018 THEME: FOOD, WORK, & POWER IN THE USA


HISTORY@WORK LECTURE
Monday, October 29, 5:30pm, Geddes Hall Andrews Auditorium
Emily Twarog, Associate Professor of History and Labor Studies at the University of Illinois, and author of Politics of the Pantry (Oxford University Press, 2018)
“Politics of the Pantry: Housewives, Food, and Consumer Protest in Twentieth Century America”
This lecture is cosponsored by the Department of History, Gender Studies, and American Studies.

 

FILM CLASSics: THE LABOR QUESTION GOES TO THE MOVIES
Sunday, November 11, 3pm, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

We are still finalizing the title, but it will feature themes resonate with the 2018 Craypo Series on Food, Work, and Power. Stay tuned for more details.

 

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK

Friday, November 16, 5pm, Geddes Hall Coffee House

Topic: Food & Work

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

 

HISTORY ALUMNI NETWORK
Wednesday, November 28-29, Geddes Coffee House
Melody Gonzalez, ND ‘05, and a colleague from the Coalition for Immokalee Workers, will address the Fair Food Program in a series of meetings with students, faculty, staff, and community members. Details to follow.

How you’ve helped us respond to violence with vision and humanity.

As we mark the one-year anniversary of the violence in Charlottesville last August, we want to pause for a moment to thank you, the friends and supporters of the National Trust and the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, for responding to hate and violence with vision and humanity.

With you, we are doing the work of justice by telling a fuller American story. With you, we are lifting up the stories of African American artists, activists, and achievers, whose courage across every generation moved our nation closer to its founding ideals. And, with you, we have launched the Action Fund, the largest private campaign ever undertaken to preserve African American history in the places where it happened. We have received gifts totaling $6 million towards our goal of $25 million. Thank you.

Your passion and generosity are making it possible for the National Trust to uplift the largely overlooked contributions of African American places, from Nina Simone’s childhood home in rural North Carolina to Chicago’s South Side Community Art Center to Memphis’ Clayborn Temple. With the philanthropic support of our donors, we have awarded grants totaling more than $1 million to advance African American preservation throughout America, at places as diverse as New York’s free community of Weeksville, African American homesteader sites across the Great Plains, and the Civil Rights sites of Birmingham.

Excavating and elevating these places and stories allows for a thorough reckoning with the complex and difficult history of race in our country, which is essential in overcoming intolerance, injustice, and inequality. As the National Trust’s Action Fund Director Brent Leggs suggests so elegantly in a Fast Company article on the events in Charlottesville, we can only understand ourselves as a country—who we are and who we aspire to be—when we have a fuller sense of who we have been over the years, together.

We have much work ahead, but in this solemn week, we hope you will take heart from the progress we have made over the past year. Thank you for standing with us to create a stronger, more united America, one where all people see their stories and potential in the places that surround us.

With our thanks and admiration for your support,

Darren Walker
AACHAF Co-Chair
Phylicia Rashad
AACHAF Co-Chair

2018-2019 Academic Year – As you prepare for your classes

I had the pleasure to meet a number of our newest Faculty to Notre Dame as part of our Hesburgh Libraries efforts to connect our colleagues to our various library services.

As the Subject Librarian for Africana Studies (The Continent of Africa, the United States and the Afro-Caribbean Diaspora) at the University of Notre Dame, I want my faculty colleagues  to consider the following Hesburgh Libraries Services as you make final plans to your Course Syllabus as well as to your Sakai site.

I have a limited budget to purchase e-Books in Africana Studies. If you have a title in mind that I should add to our library catalog please submit your request to my attention using the following form.

Our Teaching & Learning Services is a point of pride in my work in collaboration with you and your students. We have tremendous resources and accessibility to aide your research as well as opportunities for me to engage with your students in a one on one capacity. I encourage you and your students to access this link to schedule a Research Consultation with me.

Onward & Upward!

Leslie

SCOPUS Database Announcement: Send Me Your Feedback

Dear Notre Dame Colleagues & Students:

As you know, we in the library continuously strive to meet the changing needs of faculty and students with regards to finding and acquiring material to support your research. We are committed to service excellence and continuous improvement in this rapidly changing environment.

Based on considerable campus requests, the Hesburgh Libraries now has a subscription to Scopus <https://eresources.library.nd.edu/databases/scopus>.

Scopus is a search engine that covers broad subjects such as science, engineering, social sciences, and medicine, including Medline. The Scopus database includes 60+ million records:
— 38+ million records back to 1996.
— 22+ million records pre-1996 (going back as far as 1823).

Scopus competes with Web of Science <https://eresources.library.nd.edu/databases/webofscience>, which many of you are already using. Both are extensive abstract and citation databases of peer-reviewed literature, with links to the full-text: journals, conference proceedings, and some books.

We have secured a three-year trial to Scopus. Please try it, and tell us what you think. As always, feel free to contact your subject librarian <http://resources.library.nd.edu/documents/librarians-guide.pdf> if you have any questions or need assistance.

Happy Summer! -Leslie

Summer Exhibits in Special Collections – Check them out!

There’s a new spotlight exhibit in Special Collections!

Come see Marsha Stevenson’s exhibit that features dancing skeletons and a Forbes billionaire—the handiwork of French book artist Didier Mutel. “The Forbes Simulachres: The ‘Dance of Death’ Reimagined will be on display July and August.

Also on display through mid-August are:

“In a Civilized Nation: Newspapers, Magazines and the Print Revolution in Nineteenth-Century Peru,” curated by Erika Hosselkus and “Chaste, Choice and Chatty: Irish‑American Periodicals of the Nineteenth Century,” curated by Aedin Clements.

Drop in MondayFriday8:30-5:00.

Hesburgh Libraries: Article Quick Search Tool No Longer Available

Good Afternoon Africana Studies Faculty & Students:

As of the end of June-2018, the Hesburgh Libraries  subscription to Metalib, the Ex Libris software that powers the Article Quicksearch, will end. We will remove the remaining links to Quicksearch from the website, and we’ll be in touch with the owners of LibGuides who have links to Quicksearch on them.

Usage of Quicksearch, and vendor support for Metalib, has been declining steadily over the past five years, and we decided to move resources from Metalib to other priorities. All of the indexes and databases that could be searched from Quicksearch are still available, however, so we have not lost access to any content, and links to Quicksearch will redirect to a page with information about alternatives (https://library.nd.edu/article-quicksearch-retired), in case patrons have it bookmarked.

If you have any questions and or concerns, please feel to contact my Librarian Colleague, Lauren Ajamie, Electronic Resources Librarian,  lajamie@nd.edu

Happy Summer! –Leslie L. Morgan, Africana Studies Librarian