13th (2016) By Ava DuVernay – Browning Cinema: Oct. 5, 2017 -Free (ticketed) Event

13th (2016)
New at the Browning Cinema
Thursday Oct 5, 2017 — 7:00 P.M.

Get Tickets

13th (2016)

Ava DuVernay examines the disproportionate number of African-Americans among those incarcerated in the United States and the roots of the prison industrial complex.

Dialogue Circles follow.

This is a free but ticketed event. Tickets will only be available for pick-up one hour prior to the performance. To guarantee your reservation please pick-up your Will Call tickets at least 15 minutes prior to the performance. In the event of a sell out, unclaimed Will Call tickets will be used to seat patrons waiting on standby.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns

Penn State University: Postdoctoral Scholar – Africana Research Center OPPORTUNITY

Postdoctoral Scholar – Africana Research Center

The Africana Research Center invites applications for a one-year postdoctoral scholar position in any aspect of African, African American and Diaspora Studies, beginning July 1, 2018. During their residency, scholars have no teaching or administrative responsibilities, though they may request a teaching assignment. They will be matched with a mentor, attend professional development sessions and other relevant events, and be expected to be active in Penn State’s community of Africana researchers. Successful applicants must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. within the previous four academic years. Salary/benefit package is competitive.

To be considered for this position, submit complete application packets including cover letter describing your research and goals for the scholarship year, a curriculum vita (6 page maximum), and a writing sample of no more than 30 double-spaced pages. Review of applications will begin on November 15, 2017, and continue until the position is filled. Please arrange for three letters of reference to be addressed to the attention of the ESSS Selection Committee and submitted as e-mail attachments to africanacenter@la.psu.edu.

Please direct questions about the process via e-mail to africanacenter@la.psu.edu

Apply online at https://psu.jobs/job/73561

Hesburgh Libraries: Center for Digital Scholarship: Workshops – Sign Up NOW!

Center for Digital Scholarship Workshops
 
Monday, October 2, 2017
Basic Satellite Imagery Analysis
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Matthew Sisk, PhD
Using wavelengths of light beyond what our eyes can see, multi-spectral satellite imagery can tell us a lot about the earth’s environment. This workshop will present both the main types of satellite imagery available for GIS and remote sensing applications and some of the different analytical techniques. No previous use of satellite imagery is necessary, but some understanding of the fundamentals of GIS would be useful.
Tuesday, October 3, 2017
How to Write in a Book
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Eric Lease Morgan
This workshop illustrates and demonstrates a technique for writing in books for the purposes of “active reading”. The only reason one has been taught not to write in books is because the books were literally valuable and intended to be shared. With the advent to so many things “born digital”, it is entirely possible to download, print, and bind one’s own books or sets of journal articles. Such things have little monetary value, and are certainly not intended to be shared. Through an active reading process — the writing in books — one can review, retain, and comprehend so much more even with a single pass over a text. Akin to diagramming sentences, the techniques described in this workshop enable you to quickly and easily identify names, dates, definitions, numbers, citations, examples, bulleted lists, numbered lists, quotes, hyperlinks, items of questionable authority, items of interest, and items of person noteworthiness in any printed thing markable with a pencil or pen. Get more out of your reading. Write in books.
Friday, October 6, 2017
Introduction to Text Mining
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Eric Lease Morgan
This hands-on class affords participants to learn the benefits of using computers to analyze textual corpora such as a collection of books or journal articles. Sometimes called “distant” or “scalable” reading, text mining – a form of digital humanities research – is a way to literally count & tabulate the frequency of words (or phrases) in a text in order to find patterns & anomalies within it. Based on the resulting analysis, it is possible to more quickly learn what a corpus is about when compared to reading the corpus without the use of a computer. There are no prerequisites, but participants may want to bring their own laptop to the session.
Unless otherwise noted, all CDS workshops take place in the CDS Classroom (Room 129), Hesburgh Library 1st Floor Northeast.
Questions? cds@nd.edu

University of Notre Dame: Unscheduled Maintenance Alert – Please Read!

During an unscheduled maintenance window from 12:30-1:30PM, Amazon Web Services will be conducting maintenance on the network connection between Amazon and the University of Notre Dame network. Throughout this maintenance window, there may be intermittent connectivity issues to Library resources that reside in Amazon Web Services.

The following services may be impacted:
Xerxes
Koha
Inquisition
Architecture Drawings
Clavius
Biographies
Morea
SUMA
JIRA
Sysdocs
Errbit
Rabbit MQ
Kilgoure
Concordance
Coral
Time Tracker
Kiosk
Siphon
Annex IMS
TedX
DAVE
Buzz
Convocate
Fresh Writing
BeeHive
Footprints
Library Website
Asset Server
Archives Website

If you have specific questions, please let me know.

Thank you,

Ian Alford
Manager, Enterprise Systems Unit

Hesburgh Libraries
Ian.Alford@nd.edu

Irish1 Re-Carding Initiative 9:00am-4:00pm September 11th-15th, 2017 Hesburgh Library

Next week, the Irish1 re-carding initiative will come to the Hesburgh Library.  Re-carding stations will be set up in the west end of the Concourse, outside of the Fishbowl.  The stations will be open 9am – 4pmSeptember 11th – 15th.  Students, faculty and staff can all take advantage of this opportunity to exchange their current ID card for their new Irish1 Card.  You must bring your current ID card to exchange for your new Irish1 card.

For more information about the new Irish1 Card, please see:  https://irish1card.nd.edu/new-irish1card/

Best Regards,
Kelly McNally, Executive Administrator-Hesburgh Libraries, University of Notre Dame

1967—On This Day: Thurgood Marshall confirmed as Supreme Court justice

On this day in 1967, Thurgood Marshall becomes the first African American to be confirmed as a Supreme Court justice. He would remain on the Supreme Court for 24 years before retiring for health reasons, leaving a legacy of upholding the rights of the individual as guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

Related image

From a young age, Marshall seemed destined for a place in the American justice system. His parents instilled in him an appreciation for the Constitution, a feeling that was reinforced by his schoolteachers, who forced him to read the document as punishment for his misbehavior. After graduating from Lincoln University in 1930, Marshall sought admission to the University of Maryland School of Law, but was turned away because of the school’s segregation policy, which effectively forbade blacks from studying with whites. Instead, Marshall attended Howard University Law School, from which he graduated magna cum laude in 1933. (Marshall later successfully sued Maryland School of Law for their unfair admissions policy). More Information

Hesburgh Libraries: CDS Workshop: Introduction to Text Mining (Wed. Aug. 30, 2017 12:00pm-1:00pm)

Center for Digital Scholarship Workshops
Wednesday, August 30, 2017
Introduction to Text Mining
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Eric Lease Morgan
This hands-on class affords participants to learn the benefits of using computers to analyze textual corpora such as a collection of books or journal articles. Sometimes called “distant” or “scalable” reading, text mining – a form of digital humanities research – is a way to literally count & tabulate the frequency of words (or phrases) in a text in order to find patterns & anomalies within it. Based on the resulting analysis, it is possible to more quickly learn what a corpus is about when compared to reading the corpus without the use of a computer. There are no prerequisites, but participants may want to bring their own laptop to the session.

Unless otherwise noted, all CDS workshops take place in the CDS Classroom (Room 129), Hesburgh Library 1st Floor Northeast.
Questions? cds@nd.edu