The global history of war – Global History Seminar

Prof BlackProfessor Black, of Exeter University, concluded the highly successful 2011 Global History Seminars series yesterday, speaking on the global history of war. Professor Black’s books include War and the World; Why Wars Happen; and A Military Revolution?.

The Global History Seminar series will return in spring 2012. If you wish to be notified when details of the 2012 series are announced, you may want to subscribe to our ‘Global History Seminars’ tag in your RSS reader, or check with the Global History Seminars webpage.

Global History Seminar – Diseases long ago and far way

Prof. HamlinThis week’s Global History seminar featured Chris Hamlin, Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, speaking on the global history of disease, and provoking some energetic discussion amongst the seminar attendees.

Professor Hamlin is the author of exemplary studies of public health, including A Science of Impurity and Public Health and Social Justice in the Age of Chadwick. His latest book is Cholera: the Biography.

The final seminar in the 2011 Global History Seminars series will take place on Moday 28th, with Professor Jeremy Black speaking on “The global history of war.”  Professor Black, of Exeter University, is one of the most prolific, debated and wide-ranging historians in the world. His books include War and the World; Why Wars Happen; and A Military Revolution?

Attendance is free, however pre-registration is required. Please email london@nd.edu to reserve seats.

Global History Seminars – 2011 series

The 2011  Institute of Historical Research and the University of Notre Dame Global History Seminar series continues.

The audio of Dr Lockyer’s presentation on a global history of the twentieth century is now available, both streaming and for download.

An audio recording of Peter Barber’s seminar, “The image of the globe in the Renaissance”, will be available soon.

Next Monday’s speaker will be William Clarence-Smith, on “The ‘Syrian’ global diaspora: migrants from Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan since the 1880s.” The Professor of the Economic History of Asia and Africa has made many fundamental contributions on the history of commodities and labour, including Islam and the Abolition of Slavery and Cocoa and Chocolate.   Attendance is free, however pre-registration is required. Please email london@nd.edu to reserve seats.

For information about future Global History Seminars, see the website.

Global History seminars – a global history of the 20th century

Dr Andrew LockyerDr Angus Lockyer gave an interesting presentation yesterday evening, entitled  “What might a global history of the 20th century look like?”

An audio recording of the evening will be available later this week.

The Global History Seminar Series will continue next Monday with Peter Barber, the Head of Map Collections at the British Library, who will speak on “The image of the globe in the Renaissance.”

All are welcome to attend  – please see this page for details.

Synchronicity in Global Development

Lucy Badalian and Victor KrivorotovLucy Badalian and Victor Krivorotov, both of whom hold visiting appointments at the London School of Economics, presented this week’s Global History seminar on the topic of ‘Synchronicity in Global Development: from Great Divergence to Convergence?

An audio recording of the seminar is available for download.

The seminar series will continue next Monday, when Dr Angus Lockyer (SOAS) will discuss  “What might a global history of the 20th century look like?”.   All are welcome to attend  – please see this page for details.