Tag Archives: ecumenical

365 Days with Christina Rossetti–Day 3

ChristinaRossettiEditors’ Note: Christina Rossetti wrote a devotional entitled Annus Domini: A Prayer for the Days of the Year, Founded on a Text of Holy Scripture (1874). We will be featuring one of her prayers for the next 365 days. 

Day 3

Genesis 26:24

The Lord appeared unto him the same night, and said, I am the God of Abraham thy father: fear not, for I am with thee, and will bless thee.


O Lord Jesus Christ, God of Abraham, Who of stones canst raise up unto him children, give us, I entreat Thee, hearts of flesh instead of hearts of stone; and make us partakers of his faith, that we may be numbered among his children in the true Israel.

 

365 Days with Christina Rossetti–Day 2

ChristinaRossettiEditors’ Note: Christina Rossetti wrote a devotional entitled Annus Domini: A Prayer for the Days of the Year, Founded on a Text of Holy Scripture (1874). We will be featuring one of her prayers for the next 365 days. 

Day 2

Genesis 15:1

I am thy Shield, and thy exceeding great Reward.


 

O Lord Jesus Christ, our exceeding great Reward, make, I pray Thee, earth and her treasures exceedingly small in our eyes: that we may long for Thee most of all, and labour to obtain Thee first of all, and that where Thou art there may also Thy servants be. Amen.

 

365 Days with Christina Rossetti–Day 1

ChristinaRossettiEditors’ Note: Christina Rossetti wrote a devotional entitled Annus Domini: A Prayer for the Days of the Year, Founded on a Text of Holy Scripture (1874). We will be featuring one of her prayers for the next 365 days. 

Day 1

Genesis 3:15

I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her Seed; It shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise His heel.


O Lord Jesus Christ, Seed of the woman, Thou Who hast bruised the serpent’s head, destroy in us, I entreat Thee, the power of that old serpent the devil. Give us courage to resist him, strength to overcome him; deliver the prey from between his teeth, bid his captives go free; for his kingdom, set up Thy kingdom; and for the death he brought in, bring Thou in life everlasting. Amen.

Longing to Pray Like This

Tim O'MalleyTimothy P. O’Malley, Ph.D.

Director, Notre Dame Center for Liturgy

Contact Author

At the beginning of January, I spent several days in Minneapolis at the North American Academy of Liturgy. In a seminar on 16th-20th liturgical history, we opened our first session with morning prayer in common (led by Frank Senn). In the room were ELCA Lutherans and the Presbyterians, Methodists and Anglicans, Catholics and the Missouri Synod Lutherans. That morning, we chanted Lauds  in English as it was done by early to mid-twentieth century Lutherans and Episcopalians. We did so with great trepidation, lacking musical accompaniment, for the most part sight reading notes that we were glancing upon for the first time.

And yet, we prayed. At the end, it did not feel like it was some exercise in re-constructing old liturgical rites. It did not feel like a session on the history of musical notation. It was prayer, shared in common by Christians who (without a doubt) have quite different views about ministry, theology, development of doctrine, ecclesial discipline, and the moral life.

The unity of the Church today, to be frank, is not something that we can will into being with great ease. There are serious disagreements to be had among us Christians about points of doctrine and practice that really do matter to our identities. In reality, many of us Christians are in open disagreement not simply with other Christian communities but those who subscribe to the very same articles of belief that we do. Methodist against Methodist. Episcopalian against Episcopalian. Orthodox against Orthodox. Only a bloodless approach to unity wants to pass over these differences without real dialogue and argument alike.

Yet, in such moments when we really do pray together, we are offered a glimpse of the kind of unity that Christ intended within the Church. That each of us profess faith in the “catholic” Church, a Church made one through the love of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. That every human being is to be gathered together into that one body of total praise. And that one day, through a grace that we can only desire, argument and discourse will give way to praise and adoration.

In reality, we are not one. We are not yet there. The arguments and disagreements remain present and must be had. But through times of praying together, of learning to dwell together in unity (even in the midst of our very real differences), we practice that vocation of total praise which is our destiny. We long to pray not simply as an Orthodox or a Methodist or a Catholic. Rather, we long to pray as together as one body, one spirit in Christ.