“Malaria Elimination: From Evidence to Impact”: October 23, 2018 4:00pm 283 Galvin Life Science Center

Lobo-Seminar.jpg

Over the last 20 years, Dr. Neil Lobo, Ph.D. lab has conducted research in many countries, including Indonesia, Bangladesh, Solomon Islands, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Mali, Namibia, Mozambique, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Ethiopia….  The Lobo Lab conducts research, training, and service with academic, NGO, and country ministry of health programs towards advancing health standards for everyone – especially people those disproportionately impacted by preventable diseases.

HBCU Library Alliance and Digital Library Federation launch “Authenticity Project” Fellowship Program

Today, in partnership, the HBCU Library Alliance (HBCU LA) and Digital Library Federation (DLF) launched a three-year “Authenticity Project.” This fellowship program, generously supported by an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) grant, will provide mentoring, learning, and leadership opportunities for 45 early- to mid-career librarians from historically black colleges and universities, as well as meaningful frameworks for conversation and collaboration among dozens of additional participants from both organizations from 2019-2021.

Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection – Snite Museum, University of Notre Dame: August 18 – December 15 2018

This exhibit is presented by The Helis Foundation and organized by the Ogden Museum of Southern Art and The Baltimore Museum of Art

Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection
Image: Norman Lewis (American, 1909–1979), Afternoon, 1969, oil on canvas, 72 x 88 inches, © Estate of Norman W. Lewis, courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY, photo courtesy of Art Institute of Chicago.

Drawing on the Joyner/Giuffrida Collection, this exhibition celebrates Mondern and Contemporary artists of African descent, many of whom were historically overlooked by collectors, critics, scholars, galleries, and museums.

On Friday, October 26, 2018 – 5:00pm – 7:30pm – There wil be a Public Reception – FREE and OPEN TO ALL

A central theme is the power of abstract art as a profound political choice and as a declaration of freedom. These artists not only resisted racial imagery, but also, pressure to create positive representations of Black Americans.

 

University of Pittsburgh Libraries – Digital Collection: 19th Century School Books

“This is America: Dana Chandler, Art, and the Popular/Political Divide” Lecture by Carmenita Higginbotham, University of Virginia

 Thu Sep 20, 2018, 5:30PM – 6:30PM
 Annenberg Auditorium – University of Notre Dame

This lecture explores the art of Dana Chandler from the 1960s and ’70s. Through an examination of his activist imagery, her talk considers how Chandler negotiated intersections of popular culture and political action, and the ways in which such issues resonate in African American art today.

Carmenita Higginbotham is an associate professor of American art and culture at the University of Virginia. Read more about her scholarship here.

This lecture is organized in support of Professor Erika Doss’s African American Art course and is made possible through a course development grant given by the Snite Museum of Art.

Baylor University: Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching – Call For Nominations

Robert Foster Cherry Award

For more information on the nomination process, please visit baylor.edu/cherry_awards.

The Baylor University Cherry Award program is designed to honor great teachers, to stimulate discussion in the academy about the value of teaching, and to encourage departments and institutions to value their own great teachers. The award recipient will receive $250,000 and will teach in residence at Baylor University during the 2020 fall or 2021 spring semester. The award recipient’s home department will receive $25,000.

THE AWARD PROCESS

Three finalists will be chosen from the field of nominees. Each finalist will receive $15,000 and will be invited to present a series of lectures at Baylor University in the fall of 2019. Additionally, each finalist will present a Cherry Award Lecture on his or her home campus, and each home department will receive $10,000.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Baylor University’s Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching honors outstanding professors in the English-speaking world who are distinguished by their ability to communicate as classroom teachers. Individuals nominated for the award should have a proven record as an extraordinary teacher with a positive, inspiring and long-lasting effect on students, along with a record of distinguished scholarship. Nominations should correspond with academic units engaged in undergraduate teaching at Baylor.

SCHEDULE FOR THE 2020 AWARD

  • November 1, 2018
    Nomination deadline
  • Spring 2019
    Three finalists announced
  • Fall 2019
    Finalists visit Baylor University campus and make presentations; also make home campus presentations
  • Spring 2020
    Cherry Award recipient announced
  • Fall 2020 or Spring 2021
    Cherry Award recipient semester-in-residence at Baylor

Fellowship Opportunity: The Newberry – Chicago’s Independent Research Library since 1887

The Newberry’s long-standing fellowship program provides outstanding scholars with the time, space, and community required to pursue innovative and ground-breaking scholarship.

Fellows have access to the Newberry’s wide-ranging and rare archival materials as well as to a lively, interdisciplinary

Detailed information on available fellowships may be found by following the links below. For more information about the application process, visit How to Apply.

The Conservation of Dante’s 1477 Divine Comedy: Lecture this Afternoon in Rare Books & Special Collections 3pm-4pm

About the Presenter
Jeff Peachey is an independent book conservator and toolmaker based in New York City. For more than 25 years, he has specialized in the conservation of books for institutions and individuals. He is a Professional Associate in the American Institute for Conservation, has taught book conservation workshops internationally, and was recently awarded fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center (Italy) and Rochester Institute of Technology’s Cary Collection (New York). He is a Visiting Instructor for the Library and Archives Conservation Education Consortium (LACE) of Buffalo State University, New York University, and the Winterthur/ University of Delaware. “Ausbund 1564: The History and Conservation of an Anabaptist Icon” is his latest publication. He grew up in Goshen, Indiana, and is a proud graduate of Goshen College.

Peachey will share the journey of conservation through an illustrated lecture. Bibliophiles, conservators, librarians, scholars of Italian Studies, and anyone curious about the history of books and literature will find this lecture of interest. Highlights include:
Evidence uncovered during treatment, suggesting the Inferno and Purgatory cantiche may have circulated separately at one point, will be explored. Differences between historic 15th-century binding practices and modern conservation binding techniques will be highlighted, as will the sometimes problematic differences between historic and modern materials. An overview of functional and aesthetic considerations for conservation rebinding will conclude the lecture.

Hesburgh Libraries’ Zahm Dante Collection bolsters Notre Dame’s globally recognized program in Italian Studies. One of the most important volumes of the collection is its earliest printing of Dante’s Divine Comedy, produced in 1477 in Venice by Wendelin of Speyer.

Ensuring meaningful access to and use of rare and early imprints by faculty and students for research is a goal for the Hesburgh Libraries conservation and preservation efforts. Age and frequent use demands for this volume mandated restoration work. To undertake this significant treatment, the Libraries enlisted the specialized skills of accomplished conservator, Jeff Peachey.

University of Notre Dame: Center for Social Concerns-Higgins Labor Program, Fall-2018 Events

Fall 2018 Events: 

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK:

Friday, August 31, 5pm, Geddes Coffee House

Topic: Scratch your Labor Day itch by discussing what’s on your mind about the world of work

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

LUNCHTIME LABOR RAPS (Research, Advocacy, & Policy Series)

Friday, September 7, 12:30 pm, Geddes Hall Coffeehouse

“Negotiating the Future of Work: Reflections and Predictions from a Veteran Labor Lawyer”

Tuck Hopkins, ND ‘74, retired attorney from Barnes & Thornburg

Higgins Lunchtime Labor RAPS feature experts—scholars, activists, and policymakers—exploring the past, present, and future of work, in the U.S. and beyond. All Notre Dame community members are welcome, and lunch is provided for those who RSVP here.

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK

Friday, September 21, 4:30pm, Geddes Coffee House

Topic: Book Discussion of Luis Alberto Urrea’s The Devil’s Highway, a haunting account of undocumented immigrants, coyotes, and border agents

**Note the special time and format: This is part of the Center for Social Concerns’ book read in anticipation of Urrea’s campus visit on Oct. 2@5pm, in McKenna Hall. Interested in participating and want a free copy of the book? Contact the Higgins Labor Program.

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

​LUNCHTIME LABOR RAPS (Research, Advocacy, & Policy Series)

Friday, September 28, 12:30 pm, Geddes Hall Coffeehouse

“Global Unions, Strategic Campaigns: Worker Solidarity in the Age of Amazon”

Tim Beaty, ND ‘79, Director of Global Strategies, International Brotherhood of Teamsters

Higgins Lunchtime Labor RAPS feature experts—scholars, activists, and policymakers—exploring the past, present, and future of work, in the U.S. and beyond. All Notre Dame community members are welcome, and lunch is provided for those who RSVP here.

 

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK

Friday, October 26, 5pm, Geddes Hall Coffee House

Topic: TBD

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

CHUCK CRAYPO MEMORIAL SERIES: ECONOMICS, INSTITUTIONS, POWER, and SOCIAL CHANGE:
2018 THEME: FOOD, WORK, & POWER IN THE USA


HISTORY@WORK LECTURE
Monday, October 29, 5:30pm, Geddes Hall Andrews Auditorium
Emily Twarog, Associate Professor of History and Labor Studies at the University of Illinois, and author of Politics of the Pantry (Oxford University Press, 2018)
“Politics of the Pantry: Housewives, Food, and Consumer Protest in Twentieth Century America”
This lecture is cosponsored by the Department of History, Gender Studies, and American Studies.

 

FILM CLASSics: THE LABOR QUESTION GOES TO THE MOVIES
Sunday, November 11, 3pm, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

We are still finalizing the title, but it will feature themes resonate with the 2018 Craypo Series on Food, Work, and Power. Stay tuned for more details.

 

LABOR CAFE: WHERE ND TALKS WORK

Friday, November 16, 5pm, Geddes Hall Coffee House

Topic: Food & Work

Labor curious? Come to the Labor Cafe, where all persons are welcome and all opinions are tolerated.

 

HISTORY ALUMNI NETWORK
Wednesday, November 28-29, Geddes Coffee House
Melody Gonzalez, ND ‘05, and a colleague from the Coalition for Immokalee Workers, will address the Fair Food Program in a series of meetings with students, faculty, staff, and community members. Details to follow.