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Category Archive for 'Assessment Strategies'

Requiring an early assignment be handed in and graded provides a mutual check-in for you and your students.  You students will get a preview for the bigger assessments later in the semester.  They will understand the kinds of questions you ask, the amount of time it takes to complete assignments in your discipline, and the […]

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My first boyfriend’s car was his family’s old SUV named Bessie.  Having moved the kids across the country for college, carried the family on many happy vacations, and suffered the daily commute, it had exceeded the promised 200,000 mile lifespan.   Like any teenage male with a secondhand car, Bessie’s owner dreamed of installing a new […]

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Now that spring sunshine has arrived, some instructors’ thoughts have turned more darkly to the stack of final grading they will soon face.  Here are a few quick tips to make the most of these final moments of the semester:   Use Rubrics Studies tout the benefits of rubrics in grading reliably, increasing transparency, and promoting […]

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With the start of the semester fast approaching we will spend this week’s post examining a simplified introduction to Backwards Course Design by focusing on determining learning goals and planning out assessment styles for a new class. And make sure to come back next week, when the topics of syllabus creation and lesson planning will […]

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Multiple choice tests are: the best assessment strategy regardless of the situation easy to write and easy to grade unable to accurately measure a student’s knowledge assessment tools that can be useful in many situations   Multiple choice assessments are one among many assessment tools that can be used to provide formative or summative feedback […]

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In her recent two-part workshop series, Amy Buchmann–a Graduate Associate of the Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning–discussed some of the fundamentals of course design.  An integrated course design (Fink, 2003) has three primary elements: (1) learning goals, (2) feedback and assessment, and (3) teaching and learning activities. Figure 1. Integrated course design model. Fink, […]

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Many courses use collaborative projects throughout the semester which culminate with a large end of semester deliverable (oral presentation, written report, etc).  Evaluation of the deliverable and each students contribution can be difficult.  The Center for Faculty Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests weighted peer evaluation as a method for […]

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The following entry from the 2012-2013 Teaching Issues Writing Consortium: Teaching Tips was contributed by Ken Sagendorf, Ph.D Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL), Regis University. ————————————————————————————————————– Inclusive learning environments are promoted by finding out about your students and responding to what you learn.  It is this responsiveness to your students that […]

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Try having a conversation with your students about the course during the last week of class.

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Having trouble motivating your students? See the Kaneb Center blog post “Formative and Summative Feedback and Its Impact on Learner Motivation” for a tip!

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