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For years, the Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning at Notre Dame has had — in addition to a full time staff — cohorts of graduate student (and some postdoctoral) “associates,” who support and assist with the development of programming. These “PGAs” (Postdoctoral and Graduate Associates) are selected to serve at the beginning of each […]

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Teaching Study Skills

Today’s blog was originally posted by Justus Ghormley on the Kaneb Center’s blog in February, 2016. It is reposted here with minor revisions. One semester a student came to me disappointed about his grade on an exam. He told me that he had studied for nine hours yet felt unprepared for the exam. I asked […]

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Get a Teaching Well Using Technology (TWUT) Certificate: During spring break, get a jumpstart on the Teaching Well Using Technology certificate or finish the entire program in a week! These hands-on sessions are designed to help you begin working on the Teaching Well Using Technology Certificate. Each session prepares you to complete one of the […]

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This semester, we at the Kaneb Center are trying out a new programming idea. We’ve gathered together eight first-time teachers, and are meeting as a small community every week to discuss our in class challenges and victories, and share resources that are especially valuable for those at such an early stage of their career. I […]

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Early Semester Student Feedback

A month into the semester, you may have some ideas about what is working — and what is not — in the classroom. Your students have some ideas too. Now is the key time to elicit feedback from your students about what they find most and least helpful in the classroom. Students are more motivated […]

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It has long been established that student attention often begins to decline after 10 to 15 minutes of lecture (Stuart, John, & Rutherford, 1978); retention also drops considerably after the first 10 minutes (Hartley & Davies, 1978).  This can be problematic when your class lasts for an hour and fifteen minutes! Utilizing active learning strategies […]

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There are many ways in which in-class instructional time can seem overwhelming, especially to first time teachers. During my first TA experience I remember opening up a word document with the intention of writing up an agenda for the first week’s discussion. I kept staring at the document like it was a vast open prairie, […]

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Revisiting Review Sessions

This post is adapted from a November 2015 post by Joseph Michalka. With the semester drawing to a close and final exams approaching, review sessions are sure to be at the front of your student’s minds. While typically not as focused as a regular lecture, review sessions can help students draw connections between the various […]

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* Today’s post comes from the 2018-19 Teaching Issues Writing Consortium, a collaboration of over 40 institutions of higher-education. Author information is included below * A common complaint of faculty is that their students are unmotivated to learn. It does seem at times that our most brilliant lecture or most well-designed homework assignment just elicits […]

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Mid-Semester Student Feedback

by Amy Buchmann Gathering early-semester or mid-semester student feedback allows instructors to gauge what is working well in the course and determine what adjustments might need to be made.  There are several reasons for incorporating early-semester feedback into your course design and plan:  The information can be used to make changes during the current course. Students […]

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