Arts and Culture: Great Music in Chicago

One of the best things about being within reach of Chicago is having ready access to the highest level of classical musical talent in the nation. Back in 2008, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra was deemed the best in the nation, and today it remains one of the premier American orchestras. In addition, the Chicago Lyric Opera regularly puts on some of the best productions in the country, including the talents of internationally-acclaimed singers from around the world. Tickets for the Symphony are regularly priced in excess of $100 and tickets to the Lyric can cost as much as $300 or more. Fortunately for you, both venues offer student tickets at a spectacular price.

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

220 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60604
(312) 294-3000
Website

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra sells students tickets for select shows at $15 apiece, and offers the option of purchasing multiple tickets for a show. In addition, if you purchase tickets as a student for any concert on the day of the concert, you will pay 50% of their normal price. Season subscriptions are also available to students for 50% off or more. In order to prove that you are a student, you can either pre-register your ID with the Symphony Center online or bring your ID to pick up your tickets from the box office on the day of the show. Not a bad deal for some of the greatest music in history, performed by some of the best musicians in the nation. Individual tickets and subscriptions are on sale now.

Lyric Opera of Chicago

20 N. Wacker Dr.
Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 827-5600
Website

The Lyric Opera offers student tickets for $20 each to certain performances as well as a student subscription to three or more operas through their NEXT and NEXT Now programs. If you want tickets to an individual performance, you must subscribe (for free) to NEXT and, when tickets come available, you will receive a notification, at which point you can purchase your tickets. NEXT Now is the subscription option, and has some distinct advantages. You can still buy tickets for $20 apiece, but you must purchase them in advance for at least three performances. The advantage is that you can buy tickets for any performance and you don’t have to wait until dates come available. In either case, if you are fortunate, your tickets may be on the main floor of the opera house, where your neighbors will have paid five to fifteen times what you did! Individual student tickets and subscriptions are already on sale. If you have non-student friends, the Lyric also offers a membership program for young professionals (ages 21-45) that makes $35 tickets available to them. The opportunity to see vocal performers this talented for a price this low is not to be passed up lightly.

Summer in South Bend: The Big City

The perks of living in South Bend are many, and one is our proximity to the city of Chicago. One of the biggest cities in the United States, Chicago has something for everyone: museums, theaters, city parks, restaurants, and all manner of opportunity for adventure. If you are looking for food, music, or a just a stroll around the bustling downtown, the city is only a couple of hours away.

Getting to Chicago

The first step is to get to the city, a task not as easy as it may seem. The time it takes to travel to downtown Chicago by car from South Bend can vary from a low of 1 hour and 45 minutes to a high of 3 hours, depending on the time of day and the amount of traffic you encounter. If possible, you will want to avoid entering or leaving the city during the morning and afternoon rush hours, though you could hit traffic at just about any time of day. There are two major routes to Chicago from South Bend: the I-90/I-80 toll road and the I-94 interstate. Taking the toll road may save you some time, though probably not very much, and it will cost you a few dollars. Usually, taking the toll road is a better option for those who need to travel through the city to another destination.

If you are driving to the city, you’ll also need to locate a place to park. Be prepared to pay at least a few dollars though, since free parking is non-existent in downtown and other tourist-heavy areas. While there are numerous parking lots and garages near to many of the main attractions, some can be quite expensive. The best way to find an affordable and conveniently located parking spot is to use an app or website ahead of time (SpotHero and Parkwhiz are two popular options), so that you know where you are going and what you’ll be paying to park.

If you would rather avoid the headache of negotiating potentially heavy traffic and finding a spot to park, you can also take public transit from South Bend to Chicago. The most cost-effective and convenient option is the South Shore Line, an electric commuter train that runs from the South Bend airport all the way to Millennium Park in downtown Chicago. The trip takes between one and two hours, and a one-way ticket will cost you $13.50 (less if you plan to get off before Millennium Park). At many stations in the city, you will be able to make an easy transfer to a bus or to the metro. Given that the cost of parking downtown for a whole day can easily exceed $20, taking the train is not a bad option. By transferring to the metro from the Van Buren or Millennium Park stations, you can also get to either of Chicago’s major airports. (If you are just looking for transportation to the airport, you might also consider the Airport Super Saver bus service, which runs at all hours from South Bend to both of Chicago’s major airports)

Once you have made it into the big city, getting around is not difficult. You can always drive in the city, though traffic and Chicago drivers can make things a little crazy. On the other hand, downtown Chicago is very walkable, and for locations in other neighborhoods, you can also take a bus or the metro. Check out current schedules, routes, and fares on the Chicago Transit Authority’s website. Various bike rental services are also available, including Divvy, the city’s official bike rental system. They have numerous docking stations throughout the city where you can rent a bike for 30 minutes at a time with your credit card, or you can buy a day pass online before you go.

Things to Do

There is no end of things to do in Chicago, and any claim to an exhaustive list would be spurious. Below are a few suggestions for major attractions, but if you look around, you will be able to find just about anything you could want to do.

Museums and Zoos

Museum of Science and Industry

Field Museum

Adler Planetarium

Children’s Museum (free admission Thursday evenings, first Sundays)

Chicago History Museum

Shedd Aquarium

Lincoln Park Zoo (free admission)

Since tickets to these museums and to the Shedd’s Aquarium can be expensive, and since only the Field Museum offers student tickets, the most cost-efficient way to see multiple museums is to purchase a CityPASS (about $100 for adults), which gives you admission to five attractions in the city over the course of nine days, often with add-ons included. The pass includes admission to Shedd’s Aquarium, the Field Museum, the Chicago Skydeck, and your choice of either the Planetarium or the Art Institute and either 360 Chicago or the Museum of Science and Industry.

Arts and Culture

The Art Institute of Chicago (small discount for students)

The Newberry Research Library

Lyric Opera of Chicago ($20 student tickets, discounts for ages 21-45, rush tickets)

Chicago Symphony Orchestra ($15 student tickets)

Chicago Shakespeare Theater ($20 tickets for students and young professionals)

The Chicago Theatre

Food

Chicago, like every big city, has great food. Although the city is best known for deep-dish pizza (with Lou Malnati’s, Giordano’s, Pequod’s, and others all contending for the title of best) and hot dogs, you can find any other type of food imaginable if you are willing to look for it. For example, you might check out Cafe Ba-ba-reeba! for tapas or visit one of several Glazed & Infused locations for specialty donuts. If you are into coffeehouses, try Big Shoulders or The Wormhole. Pubs, cocktail lounges, and bars abound, as do restaurants serving Mexican, Korean, BBQ, Mexican-Korean BBQ, and foods that don’t belong to any category at all.  With dozens of “best of” lists available from far more knowledgeable sources, providing yet another list here would be a futile exercise at best.

Other things to do

Check out one of the numerous independent bookstores in the city, go to a Cubs or White Sox game, walk along the lake-shore, visit some of the city’s many neighborhoods, take an architecture tour, do a Big City Scavenger Hunt, or check out one of the city’s many bars and pubs, where you can hear the blues, watch some improv, or get a tropical tiki cocktail. In short, you’re not going to run out of things to do while visiting the big city of Chicago.