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The Notre Dame Parking Office is located on the first floor of Hammes Mowbray Hall.
The hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.

Website: ndsp.nd.edu/parking-and-traffic
E-mail: parking@nd.edu
Phone: (574) 631-5053

You can also find them on inside.nd.edu. Search for “iNDCARS”

Question:

I am an incoming graduate student from out of state. Do I need to get an Indiana driver’s license and vehicle registration? Thanks!

SALMON SAYS:

According to the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles, only those who claim legal residency must obtain an Indiana driver’s license or vehicle registration.  As stated on their website:

For the purposes of obtaining a driver’s license, learner’s permit, or identification card, the following persons living in Indiana solely for any of the following reasons are not considered to be residents of Indiana:

  • Educational purposes
  • Active duty in the Armed Forces
  • Temporary employment

If you plan to become a legal resident of the state of Indiana you can learn more about obtaining your license and registration online at: http://www.in.gov/bmv/2341.htm

Salmon Says:

According to the About section on the University of Notre Dame website: “The University of Notre Dame was founded in November 1842 by Edward F. Sorin, a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross, a French missionary order. It is located adjacent to South Bend, Indiana, the center of a metropolitan area with a population of more than 300,000. Chartered by the state of Indiana in 1844, the University was governed by the Holy Cross priests until 1967, when governance was transferred to a two-tiered, mixed board of lay and religious trustees and fellows. Notre Dame has grown from the vision of Father Sorin, who sought to establish a great Catholic university in America, and has remained faithful to both its religious and intellectual traditions. Over the years, Notre Dame has been a place where the Catholic Church could do its thinking. The first national study of Catholic elementary and secondary education was done at Notre Dame, as was the most extensive study of Catholic parish life and a landmark historical study of the Hispanic Catholic community in the United States. One of America’s leading undergraduate teaching institutions, Notre Dame also has been at the forefront in research and scholarship. The aerodynamics of glider flight, the transmission of wireless messages, and the formulae for synthetic rubber were pioneered at the University. Today researchers are achieving breakthroughs in astrophysics, radiation chemistry, environmental sciences, tropical disease transmission, peace studies, cancer, robotics, and nanoelectronics.

Notre Dame always has been heavily residential, with about four in five undergraduates living on campus. Students come to Notre Dame to learn not only how to think but also how to live, and often the experiences alumni carry from residence hall communities at Notre Dame remain vivid over a lifetime. The University always has attracted scholars who are interested in teaching and scholarship, men and women who know that a Notre Dame education is more than what is taught in classrooms and laboratories. Notre Dame has a unique spirit. It is traditional, yet open to change. It is dedicated to religious belief no less than scientific knowledge. It has always stood for values in a world of facts. It has kept faith with Father Sorin’s vision.”

For more information, feel free to explore nd.edu!

 

Planning a Vacation

Question: I want to plan a family vacation for May or June 2015. When does Notre Dame’s spring 2015 semester end and summer 2015 session begin?

Answer: The registrar’s office maintains the university’s current and future academic calendars, which include the dates for the first and last day of classes, semester breaks, and exams:  http://registrar.nd.edu/calendar/future.php.

Students planning a 2015 summer vacation should keep the following dates in mind:

April 29, 2015 – last class day
May 8, 2015 – last exam day
May 11, 2015 – grades due (for those teaching/grading courses)

June 15, 2015 – summer classes start

However, before booking time away from campus (whether for work or pleasure), graduate students should consult their faculty advisor or director of graduate studies. Graduate students may have additional responsibilities in their department besides coursework, and it is important that students let their PI, advisor, or department know about their plans ahead of time.

Have a great vacation!

Question: I was curious to know how you center yourself and clear your head before writing. I have had a tough time clearing my mind in getting my ideas out there. I do take pleasure in writing however it just seems like the first 10 to 15 minutes are usually lost simply just trying to figure out how to begin.

Answer: Needing a bit of time to orient yourself at the beginning of a writing session is a normal part of the writing process. If you feel you’re spending too much time getting started and not enough time actually writing or if you feel overwhelmed when you sit down to write, change how you end your writing sessions.

The best time to plan the beginning of your next writing session is at the end of your current one. At the end of a productive writing session you’ve just spent a significant amount of time immersed in the project, and you’re acutely aware of what still needs to be accomplished. Take advantage of this and spend some time thinking about what you hope to accomplish during your next session before you close your laptop. Write down the following: 1) what you accomplished today 2) your next writing session (date, time, and length) and 3) your goals for your next session. Make sure your goals are specific, measurable, and reasonable. For dissertation writers, examples might include: edit the footnotes of chapter two, figure out how to articulate the connection between data set X and theorem Y, or outline the literature review section of chapter five. Write your goals down and place them in a visible spot in your physical or digital work space. Next time you sit down to write you’ll be able to jump back into the project seamlessly.

More generally, learning about how other academics write can help you develop strategies for overcoming your own writing obstacles. Check out Gradhacker and Profhacker. Both blogs frequently post tips and reflections on academic writing issues such as overcoming writer’s block page or developing a daily writing schedule.

If you need more personalized help with your writing, schedule an appointment with a graduate tutor at Notre Dame’s Writing Center.

After reading the story of the Salmon of Knowledge, Rose asked if Fionn could taste the salmon in the small drop of oil that burned his thumb.  The myth does not speak of any particular sensations Fionn experienced, but does say that Fineagas noticed a change in Fionn’s appearance and immediately knew that the special knowledge of the salmon had been given to him.

There are many versions of this classic Irish folktale, but in each a brave leader (Fionn) goes in search of wisdom in order to better serve his people (the Fianna). At the University of Notre Dame, our graduate students come seeking wisdom and knowledge, then go forth using those gifts for the benefit of people all over the world. The Salmon of Knowledge, therefore, is the perfect symbol of the common life journey shared by the diverse members of our graduate community.

Several anonymous posts have recently been submitted to this blog with troubling concerns about hateful treatment and language. I do not know and cannot respond to the unknown author’s specific experiences.  However, I think it provides an opportunity to acknowledge the ideals for which we strive as well as the avenues of support, healing, and reconciliation when we fall short.

As stated in the student handbook, du Lac: A Guide to Student Life:

“In keeping with Catholic tradition, we seek to create a community that honors the human dignity of each member and that is characterized by a love of truth, active care and concern for the common good, and service toward others.” (http://studenthandbook.nd.edu/community-standards/)

duLac explicitly delineates that some “actions and behaviors are clearly inconsistent with the University’s expectations for membership in this community,” including:

  • Abusive or harassing behavior, including unwelcome communication
  • Behavior which causes a serious disturbance of the University community or infringes upon the rights and well-being of others
  • Willful damage to the reputation or psychological well­-being of another

(http://studenthandbook.nd.edu/community-standards/standards/)

The 2012 document, Beloved Friends and Allies, further specifies:

The University affirms the Church’s position that persons who identify as gay or lesbian “must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided” (CCC, 2358). (http://grc.nd.edu/lgbtq-allies/beloved-friends-and-allies-pastoral-plan/)

If you or someone you know has experienced discrimination, harassment, or assault, please know that help is available.  There are many resources on campus to assist you which include, but are not limited to:

If you have witnessed or been the target of hateful speech or behavior, please contact one of these organizations – not only to provide you with needed support, but to help create a world free of such violence and intolerance.

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QUESTION:

What is on-campus living like for graduate students? Is it similar to undergraduate on-campus resident life?

 

SALMON SAYS:

Notre Dame has four facilities comprising two residential communities for graduate and professional students. (http://housing.nd.edu/graduate/)

While both communities strive to provide the same strong sense of connection and support experienced in our undergrad halls, and are held to the same standards of conduct, living on-campus as a post-baccalaureate student is very different than as an undergrad.  Here are some of the key differences:

  • Students live in individual apartments & townhouses, not dormitories, which allows for greater independence and autonomy.
  • Evening quiet hours are observed all year long to provide an environment conducive to scholarly success.
  • Registered guests may stay with you, with written permission of all roommates.
  • You get to park right outside your front door!

If you would like more information about living on campus, please be in touch directly with hall staff:

Nhat Nguyen, Rector, Fischer O’Hara-Grace (nnguyen3@nd.edu)
Nathan Elliot, Rector, University Village (nelliot1@nd.edu)

QUESTION:

What do you think are the most challenging aspects of adjusting to graduate studies and what advice would you offer a new grad student?

 

SALMON SAYS:

Adjusting to graduate studies as a new grad student, like adjusting to any new situation in life, can be challenging.  Navigating the transition from student to scholar requires confidence, discipline, passion, curiosity, tenacity, and resilience. What each student finds most challenging, however, will vary based on their situation and personality, and may change as they progress through the key milestones of coursework, comps, research, and writing.

My advice as you begin this journey is this: never be afraid to ask questions or to seek help along the way!  Ask your advisor about specific expectations. Ask your program director about milestones, deadlines, and funding.  Look for opportunities for professional development and training.  Talk honestly with your peers about the things you find exciting and frustrating about your work.  Make friends with people outside your discipline to inspire new perspectives.  And if you are struggling, don’t suffer in silence – find someone you trust and ask for help.

At Notre Dame, we have a rich constellation of services and resources to support the success and wellness of our graduate students.  The links below are just a few:

http://graduateschool.nd.edu/professional_development/
http://gradlife.nd.edu/
http://ucc.nd.edu/
http://sao.nd.edu/groups/categories.html#Graduate

Additionally, there are several helpful online resources for graduate students.  I recommend:

http://gradresources.org/

SALMON SAYS:

There is a branch of the Notre Dame Federal Credit Union in the basement of the LaFortune Student Center. Additionally, there are multiple ATM machines located throughout campus for the convenience of the Notre Dame community. Map of Campus ATMs here.

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