Back from Sabbatical

[January 10th, 2020] Alas, all good things must come to an end and my sabbatical is officially wrapped up as of this Friday with the start of the spring semester this coming week.  This spring, I will be teaching the second iteration of my course on Advanced Wireless Networks and will officially be back on campus full-time at my office in 211B Cushing Hall.

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Sabbatical Update

[November 11th, 2019] Brief update as I am well over halfway through my sabbatical this fall.  Some interesting new projects in the hopper that we will highlight the projects bake a bit more but I can give a bit of a preview of some of the efforts.

  • WiFi Leaf Detection: We are looking how WiFi signals can be used to detect the presence (or lack thereof) leaves on the various trees to help optimize leaf pickup for St. Joseph County (and many other municipalities with burn bans).  Some interesting early work taking our monster WiFi capture rig (all 2.4 GHz channels, all 5 GHz channels) done by Al-Amin Mohammed, the lead graduate student on the project.  Many thanks to our undergraduate REU student Alexandra Berjarano who kicked off this effort this past summer as part of our Wireless Institute REU site.
  • QUIC-enabled FMNC / PASS: We are working on porting our efforts for Fast Mobile Network Characterization (FMNC) and Provider-Assisted Storage Sub-system (PASS) into a unified library riding on QUIC.  This should be an interesting adventure and if successful, a very cool unified platform for measurement that leverage QUIC with legacy support for TCP fallback taking advantage of our older work.
  • Tesserae: Our Tesserae project continues.  Look for some interesting paper updates now that the vast majority of our data collection has wrapped for the effort.

Papers at CHI 2019

[May 14, 2019] We had two papers appear at CHI in the Case Studies track.  One paper was a general overview of the Tesserae study and the other was an overview of our publicly accessible social media corpus related to Tesserae (all participants opted in who agreed to share data).  Both papers are accessible via the CHI website.

Panel on Cyber Security / Microgrids

[March 14, 2019] I gave a small talk at the monthly luncheon for our Energy Center on cyber security, micro grids, and the Internet of Things.  Nothing too intense as it was a fairly quick talk but I have attached my slides here if anyone is particularly interested.  Most importantly, I would strongly recommend pinging my adviser, Manimaran Govindarasu, who is the one who really works on this topic.

[PDF of talk -> MicroGrid-Security-Striegel]

 

Advanced Wireless Networks

[October 15th, 2018] I will be teaching a course in the spring on Advanced Wireless Networks.  Should be an interesting run through basic networking, basic wireless, and WiFi / cellular with a few dashes of MANET (ad hoc), D2D, and low power.  The class will be offered at the graduate level only though undergraduates are welcome to inquire.  The class is primarily targeted at CSE and EE graduate students.  Will be a nice time for me personally to shore up a broader perspective on the various 3GPP releases outside of what occasional expert work here and there entails. Synopsis for the class is below:

The focus of this course will be to explore a complete stack view of the key challenges associated with wireless networks across a variety of contexts including: wireless fundamentals, historical and contemporary wireless standards, WiFi, cellular, low power, and device-to-device / ad hoc networks.  The course will explore seminal and contemporary research papers with a focus on the systems and performance aspects of wireless networking.  The course will culminate in experimentally-focused research projects utilizing wireless technologies.

WiFi is Hot!

[September 1, 2018] For each home game at Notre Dame, our group provides WiFi for the University Relations tent on Irish Green.  For a high profile game such as the Michigan game, there are a few more challenges with the crowd density as well as nearby other tests.  Our WiFi gear has been newly re-racked in our WiFi “cart” as you can see below.

The WiFi seemed to fare OK though there are certainly some nice improvements that we can make for the next home game both to the cart as well as how we mount gear to the side of the tent.  More to come over the next few weeks with respect to the WiFi service and general performance estimates as we start to deploy our Fast Mobile Network Characterization app across the tent and various scattered Raspberry Pis in the tent.