Karoke in the Bend

In this post, Elvin Morales gives us the low-down on the best ways to do Karoke in South Bend. 

Hello dear readers,

Today is the day where my long-awaited… Alright, you guys probably didn’t even remember me mentioning I was going to write another post, but feel excited nonetheless because here I will finally talk about the one thing that gets me out of bed in the morning (other than healthy love of my profession and friends), and that is karaoke! *epic explosion sounds* Yes, you heard it right, the most epic of musically-inclined competitions where anyone can participate in rhythmic verbal combat. Come and test your mettle against a random group of people that may or may not judge you for the caliber of your voice, the crappy song you chose that has been heard like 90,000 times before (nobody wants to hear you sing “Sweet Caroline” again Chad!), and whether or not the fact that you don’t care about how you sound makes you the most awesome person in the place.

Aside from the pure awesomeness that I described earlier, karaoke is truly one of my favorite activities because it gives me an opportunity to let loose, and in those brief 5 minutes that I am up there everything else fades away it is just me, the mic, and the letters on the screen. Karaoke has served me as a tool for getting over my shyness about my singing, about being on stage, as well as to meet people and be more social, improving my life overall. Because of these reasons I want you to know about some really cool karaoke events around town so that you can benefit from kicking some metaphorical musical butt too. Here are some good karaoke options around town for most days of the week:

The first guy we’re going to talk about is my friend Garrett Swanson, he heads karaoke operation here in South Bend and Mishawaka and is one of the best and nicest guys you will ever meet. Aside from an awesome personality he also has one of the best and most versatile voices I’ve heard, singing anything from “Kings of Leon” to “Breaking Benjamin”. Below is his schedule:

  • Smith’s Downtown Tap and Grill: Sundays and Wednesdays from 6pm-11pm
  • O’Rourke’s Irish Pub: Tuesdays from 10pm till close (this is Karaoke Olympics, bring you’re A-game)
  • Danny Boy Draft Works: Thursdays from 9pm-12am

Mikey Trix is also another karaoke host around the South Bend area with his own series of events called “Trix Karaoke”, here is where you can find him:

  • Madison Oyster Bar: Mondays from 10pm till close
  • Taphouse on the Edge: Thursdays and Fridays from 9pm till close

There are many other events that due to space constraints I haven’t even mentioned, but remember that no matter which one you are interested in going to, all of these events are free to join and help support local South Bend and Mishawaka businesses. So, go out and enjoy a night with your friends while helping yourself and the local economy, but before you do I shall leave you with a few words of wisdom my fellow musical warrior: “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle – Philo”

Getting the Most from Heburgh Libraries

In this guest post, Mandy Havert, Graduate Outreach and Digital Research Librarian in charge of Graduate Outreach Services, shares how to make the most of your Hesburgh Libraries experience. 

As a new graduate student or returning student at Notre Dame, you will find the Hesburgh Libraries has a lot to offer. Begin by checking out this guide for getting started with Hesburgh Libraries before you come to campus: https://resources.library.nd.edu/documents/faculty-checklist.pdf  Once you have a campus network login – your NetID – you will be able to sign in and customize your library account. We have debuted a new service on our library.nd.edu site called “Favorites” that can help track your preferred electronic resources and materials. My Account services help you to monitor the status of materials you have borrowed from our local collections or materials you have requested from other libraries.

In addition to our materials and collections, take a look at people and events in the Hesburgh Libraries. We have over 30 subject librarians located throughout campus to help you become familiar with what’s available to you, and to keep you up-to-date on how the libraries can support your research. You are able to request purchases for our collections, and if you develop a working relationship with your librarian, he or she will be able to anticipate what’s important for your research. Contact information for our subject librarians is available to you from our directory page: https://directory.library.nd.edu/directory, Visit this page to learn about campus locations for the Hesburgh Libraries: https://library.nd.edu/hesburgh-floor-maps#

The “Events” section of the library home page is regularly updated and includes information about special events, exhibitions, and workshops. Be sure to check our events listings regularly. The Graduate Student Newsletter also includes information on these and other events and is delivered right to your mailbox!

Workshops held by the libraries range from learning ways to add to your citation and research management skills to conducting archival research. Digital scholarship workshops are offered by our Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship. Regular workshops include beginner and intermediate sessions for building your professional web presence, how to use geographical information systems, working with data and statistics, and text mining. You can register for workshops using the Hesburgh Libraries Workshop Calendar: http://nd.libcal.com/calendar/allworkshops/?cid=447&t=m&d=0000-00-00&cal=447

If you’re not sure where to start, you can reach out to the graduate services librarian, Mandy Havert – mhavert@nd.edu, to ask questions and receive some tips on how to get the most out of the Hesburgh Libraries. Mandy will fill you in on regular events, such as our weeklong Dissertation Camps, and regularly scheduled Dissertation Day Camps.

Guiding Principles from Grad Career Services

In this guest post, Robert Coloney, Director of Grad Career Services, shares some advice on what principles will help us successfully navigate this Academic Year and beyond.

Welcome (back, should it apply to you) to the University of Notre Dame! Since 1842, the campus has always been most exciting when you, our students, grace it with your presence. After an extremely active summer planning and identifying ways to better provide value and insight to have a positive impact on your future, our Graduate Career Services team is ready to engage with you!

I firmly believe that life and our purpose therein becomes clearer as you allow yourself to embrace change, challenge, and faith. As you navigate to South Bend, either for the first time, or to continue a journey of exploration, you are undoubtedly called to have a profound impact on the world around you. Much like Father Edward Sorin, each of you have seen beauty, promise, and a future in the University of Notre Dame, and yourselves. Upon arriving on the banks of the St. Joseph River, and writing back to Father Basil Moreau in 1842, Father Sorin knew of the tremendous potential, believed in the opportunity, and in turn, founded our University…YOUR University. As we begin this academic year, we, the administration of this University, see that same tremendous potential, and believe in your opportunity to enact positive change on our nation, and our world. Throughout this year, and your time at the University of Notre Dame, I encourage you to stand by a few principles (from a career perspective, and beyond):

  • Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable. Allow yourself to be challenged. Go beyond the realms of where you’ve ventured before. Say “YES,” more than you say “NO.” By allowing yourself to experience all that the University has to offer, you will be immersing yourself in the tremendous educational opportunity you’ve afforded yourself through your tireless effort and work to this point. To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice your innate gift; experience everything.
  • Find a Sherpa. No one would dare climb to the top of Mount Everest without one. In turn, no one is expecting you to navigate a challenging journey alone. Find a mentor, administrator, staff member, faculty member, or better yet, all of the above. Ask questions! Graduate School is challenging, but we’re all in this mission together. We want you to succeed, and want to ensure you have every tool available to you in order to make that dream a reality.
  • Failure is not permanent, unless you allow it to be. Each one of us, at one point or another, has been humbled in this life. We’ve all succeeded, but, personally, I’ve learned far more from my failures than my successes. In fact, I attribute any success I’ve had to the learning experiences that bloom from failure. In the words of the inspiring Randy Pausch, “The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out; the brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something. The brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough.”

When Father Sorin founded Notre Dame, and corresponded with Father Moreau, he recognized that while the future was unclear, and the undertaking significant, the potential was tremendous. “…this college cannot fail to succeed…Before long, it will develop on a large scale…It will be one of the most powerful means for good in this country.”

Since 1842, the University of Notre Dame has held true to those incredibly powerful words. Now, YOU are tasked with continuing the mission. I encourage you to take advantage of this very special place – we are lucky to have you, and cannot wait to work with you on achieving your dreams, and realizing your full potential.

Your Research Matters. You Matter. Be a Force for Good.

Robert J. Coloney

A Long Look at Art with Art180

In this guest post, Rachel Heisler, Assistant Curator for Education, Academic Programs at the Snite Museum of Art, provides offers some key ways to learn to really appreciate the rich art collection available on campus! 

Did you know that the average museum visitor spends between 15-30 seconds in front of a work of art? It takes me approximately 15 seconds to tie both of my shoes, to scroll through 7 Instagram posts, or enjoy a warm chocolate chip cookie from Hagerty Cafe (ok, that may be a lie, it’s more like 5 seconds!). 15 seconds is short, especially when you are standing in front of a work of art. To challenge people to take a longer look we created Art180 at the Snite Museum of Art – a commitment to look at one work of art for three hours over the semester.  During the 2018-2019 academic year over 220 people signed up to commit to 3 hours of looking and we hope you will consider joining us for the 2019-2020 academic year. To get you started I am sharing with you some helpful tips and tricks.

  • Set an alarm – Referencing the inventor of Ronco rotisserie cooker, “set it and forget it!”. Set an alarm and dive in to your work. In a busy stressful world, it’s helpful to take control of small things. By removing the distraction of constantly looking at your clock, you are now able to focus your attention entirely on the work.
  • Make it a date – Make your time with your work feel important and special by adding it to your calendar every week or maybe every month.  Treat it like a date by showing up on time and giving it your full attention, but please don’t bring it chocolate and flowers.
  • Don’t look at the label and don’t Google! – Do yourself a favor and bask in the unknown. You’re not going to be graded on knowing the artist, name of the work, or even the meaning of the work. What you take away from this experience is yours and only yours. Challenge yourself to not read about the work and enjoy the visceral experience.
  • Start by taking a visual inventory – Don’t know where to start? Start by writing down everything you see. Take an inventory of the work and keep adding to it throughout the semester as you will never stop seeing new things.
  • Make yourself comfortable – We want to let you in on a little secret….museums are not as scary as many think they are. Yes, there are rules and yes, museums have a certain stereotype, but really it is all in what you make it. Once you enter the front doors, drop your stuff in the coatroom and grab a stool or meditation cushion to make yourself comfortable. Stand, sit, or meditate in front of your work, but make sure you’re comfortable.

 Now that we’ve given you some tips, what do you have to lose? Sign up here to become a part of the Art180 family. You may not receive a medal or a letter of achievement but we do hope you escape from your busy days and get to know a work of art at the Snite Museum of Art this semester.

 

“Business-y”

Terms and strategies within career development tend to feel very business-y”. The one page resume and “networking” just to name a couple. As an educator who has supported humanities, fine arts, and social science students with their career development over the past seven years, I find it difficult to connect with the mainstream terminology and approach that often dominates the landscape of career education. From my perspective, it takes changing perspective to better relate to, and understand, the career development process and all that it entails.

To begin, “business-y” terms feel more product-driven. In the business world, there tends to be a bottom line. Even though there are always people involved in any business, it seems the focus is on numbers, not names. This, I believe, has led to product-like hiring trends (one page resume, applicant tracking systems) and cold connectedness through competitive, passive, and getting ahead “networking”.

From a human services perspective, people are the focus. For those who are committed to this craft, any use of a product needs to have a direct correlation to the betterment of others. It isn’t about the bottom line; it is a focus on raising the bar of potential for others.  A person-first mentality can lead to hiring practices that focus on getting to truly know an individual through robust application materials and a willingness to connect directly without the use of applicant tracking systems. When it comes to networking, it does not become a means to an end to get ahead but centers on developing and building meaningful, genuine, and value-oriented relationships. It is active listening, not passive conversation. It is cooperation, not competition.

Overall, the key is to realize that there are a variety of approaches to anything you do in life and to decide on what you perceive to be the best approach for your unique values, interests, personality, skills and goals. If you prefer competition, networking, fast-paced environments, and a slew of other terms that tend to feel more “business-y”, there are certainly options for you. For those who don’t fit this mold, know that there are other ways to view this process. Solving societal problems instead of outperforming people can be your competition. Building genuine personal and professional relationships based on trust and cooperation can be your networking. Slowing down and taking the time to reflect can be your pace. There is a place in the career development process for being “human-y”.

Erik Simon
Arts and Letters Graduate Career Consultant (Center for Career Development – Graduate Career Services)

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Self-Care: Who Has Time for That?

In this guest post, Gabrielle Pointon, M.S., Psychology Intern at the University Counseling Center, addresses the importance of self-care for graduate students. 

Self-Care. It’s an infamous word that you all have probably heard, but often ignore because of how impossible it seems. You don’t have the time. You don’t have the energy. There are more important things to do. I urge you to really think about this concept of self-care. As you are reading this, how are you feeling? Run down? Burnt out? Sleep deprived? Graduate school is a prime period in your life to feel this way because you have so much to accomplish in such a small amount of time. You probably even feel guilty when you take time for yourself because you could be doing something “more productive.”

This outlook has led to an epidemic, a crisis if you so choose, in the mental health of graduate students. You all have a lot of pressure on your shoulders, and this pressure leads to isolation and feelings of inadequacy. To make it even more difficult, you are in the minority in terms of educational achievement, so most of the people outside of your academic circle cannot even comprehend the stress you are under or the work you are trying to complete. If you are still in graduate school, you’re winning, but that doesn’t mean you don’t feel like you’re drowning at the same time. This is why graduate students have been found to be SIX TIMES more likely to experience depression and anxiety than the general population.

So, why is self-care important? Part of the reason is because students with a good work-life balance have significantly better mental health outcomes. This means making sure you take care of your basic needs, such as getting adequate nutrition and sleep, is important, but it’s more than just that. It’s taking a break and recharging too. It is essential that you are trying to disconnect from school by having a set time each day to find a little piece of comfort and joy. Self-care looks different for each person, so this could consist of social time, meditation, exercising, engaging in a hobby, etc. If you feel guilty about even the idea of taking breaks, remember that research demonstrates breaks lead to more productivity in the long run.

The take away here is this: make self-care just as much a priority as your work. Some days you’ll have hours and some days you’ll merely have minutes, but your mental health is dependent on these types of choices. Let’s make your graduate career a positive one to look back upon!

How can we, as a community of graduate students, prioritize self-care in our daily lives? What are your favorite strategies for practicing self-care? Leave a comment below!