Cultural Cold Climate Coping Mechanisms among Reindeer Herders

Our new paper in ARCTIC is out! This paper looks at the cultural cold climate coping mechanisms among the reindeer herders we worked with in 2018 and 2019. We discuss different coping behaviors that range from physical activity style decisions, ecological knowledge, technology, clothing, food, and more!

A picture from this paper was also chosen to be the cover of the upcoming ARCTIC Issue.

Please contact me for a PDF!

Dare To Be Human

I recently had the opportunity to be on the Dare To Be Human podcast that is hosted by Kat Koppett and Livia Walker who I was fortunate enough to get to know and befriend during my time in Albany, NY. They are a part of the Mop Co Improv Theatre, where my husband did improv for almost three years. They were also essential to the improv and anxiety study I conducted with colleagues.

I thought this interview was going to revolve entirely around that study, but it didn’t! It was perhaps one of the most wonderfully wide-ranging interviews I have ever been a part of. I touch on a number of topics that are near and dear to my heart, and I am so grateful to Kat and Livia for giving me the time and space to discuss them.

Have a listen here – I hope you enjoy!

Rock and a Cold Place: Neanderthal Biocultural Cold Adaptations

Comparison of a female Neanderthal to a female anatomically modern human. Illustration by Morgan Zepf

My review paper on Neanderthal biocultural adaptation to cold (email me for a copy), written with the amazing Dr. Sarah Lacy and Alexandra Niclou, came out today!

This paper was born out of a poster (link to file below) I and Alex made for a special American Association of Physical Anthropology poster session held to celebrate Dr. Erik Trinkaus‘ career. It was a wonderful session that gathered together all of his students.

A picture of Dr. Erik Trinkaus and many of his students. A truly wonderful celebration of his career and impact on the field.

For this poster, we wanted to talk about the different mechanisms that may have been utilized by Neanderthals to survive and thrive in cold climates. While making this poster, we realized that there was no paper that brought together the anatomical, physiological, and cultural evidence of Neanderthal cold climate adaptations. So, we decided to write one! We brought my friend, colleague Sarah Lacy in on this as Neanderthals are her area of expertise, and we got to work!

This paper puts in one place the variety of different cold climate adaptations Neanderthals may have had. Furthermore, we identify ten different areas we think should be the focus of future research.

I adore this paper for many reasons:
1. This paper provided the opportunity to collaborate and write with two brilliant women who I adore. Writing with them was a joy, and we worked incredibly well together.
2. The the image of Neanderthals and Anatomically Modern Humans depicts females…such a rare thing. This figure was also drawn by an undergraduate student of mine, Morgan Zepf.
3. It has an awesome reference list! The original draft had 275 references, but had to cut that down to 100 to fit the journal guidelines.
4. This will be a great paper to use in undergraduate classes!
5. We hope this paper will guide and inspire future dissertations.
6. I started writing this review on my Spring Break 2020 where I went to a cabin in the middle of no where and just wrote. When I emerged from this writing retreat, the entire world had gone on lock down due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper will always hold an odd place in my memory because of that.

Meet a Scientist

One of the very best things about this job is getting to meet and talk with so many wonderful people. Sometimes this happens by chance and sometimes it is intentional. This time, it was a bit of both.

Due to the low key viral success of Ruby’s Laboratory Manual, I was contacted by the St. Joseph County Public Library (SJCPL) to take part in the Science Alive month-long event. With the help of the Eck Institute for Global Health, we were able to provide almost 500 grab-and-go single science experiment bags to SJCPL to distribute to children.

Seeing the focus on women scientists in Ruby’s Lab Manual SJCPL, specifically Rada Ragimbekov, wanted to collaborate on putting together an event for Women’s History Month. We decided to hold a Meet a Scientist panel discussion event for children featuring a diverse group of women scientists.

SJCPL Meet a Scientist
Poster for the Meet a Scientist Event

I was honored to moderate the discussion featuring Dr. Nydia Morales-Soto, Dr. Joyce Adams, Mauna Dasari, Kayla Hurd, Dr. Mayland Chang, and Chelsea Southworth.

Each of these women during this even shared their science, the educational journey, the challenges they have faced as women in science, and words of wisdom. I think we all left that event inspired by the strength, persistence, and creativity of these amazing women. It was one of those activities that many my shrug off as silly extra service, but I consider it potentially one of the most impactful parts of my job.

Though we had to hold the event virtually, it was amazing to be a part of this amazing group of women scientists.

The research that keeps on giving

Every winter for the past four years I have been interviewed about my work in cold climates, and in particular, what the benefits of exercising in the cold may be. Each year, I think the call for interviews for stop. Each year I am wrong.

However, this year might be the biggest outlet yet, – Washington Post! I was very excited to do this interview, and Christie Aschwanden did a fantastic job! I could have chatted with her for hours, and I am incredibly grateful to her for taking my ramblings and making them something coherent.

Improv & Anxiety

We got a nice little write up by PsyPost about our work looking at stress, anxiety, and absorption among comedy improvisors.

I always enjoy doing interviews or answering questions, but I always get very personally anxious about it. Once you put the information out there, you lose control of it. However, Beth Ellwood at PsyPost did a great job.

Women in STEM Coloring Books!

I am always on the look out for fun ways to demonstrate to my niece the diversity of women in STEM fields. Luckily, there are so many kind and generous folks in STEM who are willing to do the heavy lifting, and often in beautifully creative ways.

Here are two Women in STEM coloring books to share with the budding scientists in your family!

Think like a Girl by the Vilchek Foundation

ColorMePhD by Dr. Julie Rorror